Archive for February, 2014

Rose Oh (Bronson)

Posted On February 23rd, 2014 -

2-23-Rose-OhROSE OH (BRONSON) Rose Oh (Bronson) passed peacefully on Valentine’s Day 2014 after a long bout with dementia. She is survived by her daughters Velvet and Debra. A private celebration of life will be held on Oahu. If you would like to participate, please send an email to: rose.oh.bronson@gmail.com

Jean Mitsuko Haraguchi (Honma)

Posted On February 27th, 2014 -

JEAN MITSUKO HARAGUCHI (HONMA) 84, died on February 22 in her home in Reno, NV. Born in Honolulu, she went to St. Francis School of Nursing and was an ER nurse for many years. She and husband Sueki raised 3 children in Torrance, CA, then moved to Reno 9 years ago. She is survived by husband Sueki, daughter Gayle (Sam) and son Mark; all of Reno; son Gary of Grants Pass, OR and granddaughter Raelynn Gardner of Los Angeles. She is also survived by brothers George (Bernie), James (Yuri) and Harry (Miki) Honma of Hawaii. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation in Jean’s name to a charity benefitting animals or children. A Celebration of Life service will be held in Torrance later this year. Jean will be greatly missed.

Harold Hubert (Skip/Pineapple)

Posted On February 8th, 2014 -

HAROLD HUBERT (SKIP/PINEAPPLE) 70, passed away Dec.5,2013 in Citra, FL from cancer. Born July 17,1943 He was a Navy Vietnam Veteran. He spent most of his life on or around horses in Hawaii, Indiana, Georgia and Florida. When no longer able to compete, he gave riding lessons to young people. He never met a person who didn’t become his friend. He will be missed for his kolohe laugh and his big Hawaiian heart. Survived by sisters, Marilyn (Leroy) Wren (Denver,CO), Jeanne Kalahiki (Palm Desert,CA), brothers, Murdock (Norma) Weltzien (San Diego, CA), Thomas (Jackie) Weltzien (Orange, CA), Companion Juanita Smith. Family scattered ashes off Waikiki,HI. Condolences to Weltzien Ohana, 45-336 Kahowaa PL Kaneohe, HI 96744.

Eric Bercovici /1933-2014

Posted On February 22nd, 2014 -

By David Colker / Los Angeles Times

Screenwriter Eric Bercovici knew he was not the first choice to adapt “Shogun,” the blockbuster 1975 novel by James Clavell about an English seaman marooned in 17th-century Japan. Bercovici, who worked on the Paramount lot, read the novel anyway.

“I knew right away how to adapt it,” he said in a 1981 Los Angeles Times interview. “But damned if I would tell them.”

Other writers fell by the wayside, and he was called to meet with Clavell, who had creative control over a proposed TV miniseries based on the book. Bercovici told him that major plot points and characters would have to go. Clavell was not receptive.

Until the next day when they met again. Clavell handed Bercovici a paperback copy of the novel with whole sections torn away. “He took out everything I suggested wouldn’t work,” Bercovici said. “I wrote the script from it.” The result was one of the highest-rated productions in TV history and prime-time Emmys for both men.

Bercovici, 80, died Feb. 9 at his home in Kaneohe. The cause was a heart attack, his son Luca said.

In addition to writing, Bercovici produced “Shogun,” which was the biggest hit of his career. It took nearly six months to shoot the 12-hour miniseries in Japan. Translation problems and cultural clashes abounded, and Bercovici did not always resolve them in the most diplomatic manner.

The residents of a neighborhood near where a key night sequence was being filmed lodged so many complaints with police that it appeared production there would have to shut down. Not even pleas from famed actor Toshiro Mifune, one of the stars of the miniseries, mollified the neighbors. Then Bercovici caught a break.

“Happily, President Jimmy Carter came to Tokyo at that time, and every single policeman in Japan went to protect him,” Bercovici said in a documentary, “The Making of ‘Shogun.’” “So if the neighbors were calling in complaints about our noise, there was no one to answer the phone.”

“Shogun,” starring Richard Chamberlain and shown over five nights in 1980, got mixed reviews. But the ratings were higher than for any other miniseries up to that time with the sole exception of “Roots.”

Bercovici said the success of the show belied naysayers who said audiences would not accept devices such as the use of untranslated Japanese in some sequences. “I think it has demonstrated that the television audience is much more discerning and sophisticated than they have been given credit for,” he said in a 1980 Times interview. “Rather than the usual TV fare we all know and love, the audience does want programs of a higher quality.

“And I say with no modesty whatsoever that I consider ‘Shogun’ high quality.”

Bercovici was born Feb. 27, 1933, in New York, the son of screenwriter Leonardo Bercovici, who worked on films such as “The Bishop’s Wife” (1947). He studied theater at Yale, but his early career was interrupted when his father was blacklisted during the McCarthy era.

Eric Bercovici worked on several films in Europe, returning in 1965 to the U.S. where he wrote episodes of “The Man from U.N.C.L.E.,” “I Spy” and others. He wrote the 1968 film “Hell in the Pacific” (co-starring Mifune) and a handful of other films, but almost his entire career was in television.

He also wrote crime novels. The income from them was slight compared with his TV work, but he said that didn’t matter. “When you write scripts, the minute you write ‘fade out’ all these people — directors, producers, studios, sometimes other writers, networks — enter your life,” he said in the 1981 Times interview. “When you write a book, you are all these people.”

Bercovici is survived by his wife, Chiho; sons Luca, Hilary and Jacob; half-brothers Adam and David; half-sister Christina; and two grandchildren.23-B4-BERCOVICI-OBIT_LA_LONG

Posted in Featured

George Castagnola: 1932-2014

Posted On February 27th, 2014 -

Restaurateur inspired wave of Italian eateries in Hawaii
By Gary T. Kubota

A chef whose Manoa Valley restaurant served as the training ground for restaurateurs of Italian cuisine on Oahu for decades has died.

George “Cass” Castagnola died Feb. 2 with relatives by his side in New Jersey. He was 81.

Castagnola, born in Manhattan, was the son of Italian immigrants and operated a successful restaurant in New Jersey. He would close his restaurant for a week or two in February while vacationing in Hawaii, his son George Jr. said.

“He finally had enough of bad weather,” George Jr. said.

George Jr. said Castagnola worked with a friend at Michel’s to open Castagnola’s at Manoa Marketplace in 1984 and continued operating it until 1990, when he sold it.

George Jr. said his father brought whole containers of food from Italy.

“‘It’s not so much the recipe as it is the ingredients’ was my father’s mantra,” the son said.

At one point Castagnola operated six restaurants but tired of it and made his exit.

The restaurant was so good that celebrities including Don Ho and Tom Selleck were frequent visitors, George Jr. recalled.

“Frank Sinatra had him ship meatballs to Cali­for­nia,” he said.

Castagnola once turned down a reservation by President Richard Nixon because the arrangement would cause an inconvenience to regular customers, and his regular customers came first, he said.

“It wasn’t political,” George said.

Castagnola’s became a template for a style of Italian restaurant popular to an entire generation and more, according to a food critic.

Some people who worked for Castagnola eventually opened their own restaurants, including Verbano, Paesano and Assaggio.

The memorial for the restaurateur is scheduled for 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday at the Elks Club in Waikiki. The service will take place from 10:30 to 11 a.m.

“His ashes are being brought here to be spread in the ocean at Waikiki Beach,” George Jr. said.

Castagnola is also survived by son John, daughter Barbara, a granddaughter and a great-granddaughter.

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Posted in Featured

Franklin Schowengerdt: 1936-2014

Posted On February 27th, 2014 -

Physicist recognized isles’ value to space research
By Joie Nishimoto

Franklin Schowengerdt, regarded as a visionary leader of space research programs in Hawaii, has died of cancer in Alexandria, Va. He was 77.

Schowengerdt, a physicist and former program director at NASA, was the founding director of the Pacific International Space Center for Exploration Systems, also known as PISCES.

He was also U.S. vice chairman of the Japan- U.S. Science, Technology and Space Applications Program (JUSTSAP).

His career included teaching positions at the Colo­rado School of Mines, Cali­for­nia Institute of Technology and the University of Hawaii at Hilo.

In a tribute written last week, former Gov. George Ari­yo­shi called Schowen­gerdt “a man of diverse talents and impeccable vision.”

The state Legislature also recognized Schowengerdt’s career, saying his efforts at JUSTSAP and PISCES helped to make space exploration more sustainable as well as more affordable through international partnerships.

Jim Crisafulli, director of the Hawaii Office of Aerospace Development, said he worked with Schowengerdt “for decades” and that Schowengerdt worked assiduously to advance Hawaii’s engagement in space research, making the state a major contributor to and beneficiary of global space enterprise.

“He recognized the unique assets of the state — being in the Pacific and so close to the equator as well as Hawaii’s moon-Mars-like terrain,” Crisafulli said. Rocket launches are more efficient near the equator because they take advantage of the earth’s angular momentum.

Crisafulli said Schowen­gerdt was also passionate about opening up job opportunities for aspiring scientists in Hawaii.

A memorial service will be held May 8 in Arlington. Schowengerdt died Feb. 12.

He is survived by wife Ellen, daughter Anna, son John and brother Richard.

Contributions can be made to the Frank Schowengerdt Memorial Fund at the University of Hawaii at Hilo’s PISCES account, No. 125-9480-4, through the University of Hawaii Foundation.

The donations will help to provide opportunities and scholarships for students to pursue studies in space research.

“I believe it is incumbent upon our community to both honor and realize Frank’s vision by supporting the ongoing efforts of the University of Hawaii, local industry, our visionary Legislature and the state Office of Aerospace Development to expand and diversify our spaceward quest,” said Ari­yo­shi, U.S. adviser to JUSTSAP. “In so doing, we will assuredly enable a more compelling and rewarding future for the people of Hawaii Nei.”

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Posted in Featured

Nelson Fujio: 1949-2014

Posted On February 17th, 2014 -

by Gordon Y.K. Pang / gpang@staradvertiser.com

Some kids see firefighters or doctors in action and want to grow up to do the same.

As a 5-year-old, Nelson Fujio observed the Military Day Parade at Ala Moana Park and wanted to start his own parade.

Fujio — who headed the Hono­lulu City Lights Electric Light Parade from its inception in 1991, founded the Hono­lulu Festival and coordinated a number of other parades and college bowl game halftime shows — died Feb. 9 in Hono­lulu. The “Parade Man,” as he was known, was 64.

Carol Costa, Hono­lulu City Lights coordinator from 1985 to 2004, said Fujio was the unseen coordinator of most parades staged on Oahu in recent decades. At one point Fujio was coordinating nine parades a year including the Hula Bowl and Aloha Festival parades, Costa said. His family persuaded him to scale back to three.

Fujio dreamed of working at Disneyland, but as the eldest son in a traditional Japa­nese family, he instead was tasked with helping carry on his family’s business, Auto Fender Clinic in Kaka­ako, wife Diane Fujio said.

So he channeled his passion by helping out local parades.

His greatest joy came from walking the routes of the parades he coordinated and seeing “miles of smiles,” she said. “That was his true paycheck.”

Fujio traveled to Japan to learn about the significance of the “miko­shi,” small portable shrines, which led him to establish the Hono­lulu Festival and expand the Pan-Pacific Festival, now in its 35th year.

Ellen Pelissero, former executive director of the Aloha Week Festivals, said it was the Fujios who first asked to volunteer with the celebration in the 1980s. When she became head of the Aloha Week group and found that it was in debt, Fujio was instrumental in persuading key businesses to make the donations that saved it from going under, Pelissero said.

Pelissero compared running a parade to being ringmaster of a three-ring circus. “It’s crazy most of the time, and the clock is ticking down and deadlines are looming,” she said. “And for the Aloha Week Parades, the ‘sea of calm’ in the center was always its ringmaster, Nelson Fujio.”

Costa said she first met Fujio when the late Mayor Frank Fasi asked her to create a homecoming parade for military personnel returning from Operation Desert Storm in 1991.

“Everyone said, ‘Get Nelson Fujio,'” Costa said. With only two months’ preparation time and Fujio’s help, the parade featured more than 100 military units, she said.

Later that year Fujio suggested that Costa add an evening parade of decorated city work vehicles to the opening-night festivities for Hono­lulu City Lights. From there Fujio and veteran city employee Eddie Oi began a tradition that continues each first Saturday of December.

Fujio and the volunteers on his Electric Light Parade committee not only put together the event, but also took great pride in designing and building the Santa float that closed out each year’s march through downtown Hono­lulu. Fujio proclaimed the 2013 Santa float his best effort, she said.

“I was sad to hear of the passing of Nelson Fujio, affectionately known as the Parade Man,” Mayor Kirk Caldwell said in a statement. “He was passionate about parades, and he gave generously of his time and expertise to make sure that the city’s parades were successful.”

Aside from wife Diane, Fujio is survived by sons Patrick and Neal, brother Alton and sisters Gloria Osumi and Candace Kawa­kami.

Services will be held March 4 at 6 p.m. at Hosoi Garden Mortuary. He will be inurned at Honpa Hongwanji Betsuin.

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Posted in Featured

Hope Staab: 1951-2014

Posted On February 9th, 2014 -

Hope Staab, an influential member of the foreign-language teaching community in Hawaii who led Punahou School’s Wo International Center to become a model of global education, died of cancer Feb. 3, the school announced late Saturday.

She was 62.

“Over Hope’s 37 years at Punahou, she touched the lives of many students and colleagues, while also building an extraordinary global community of educators and friends,” Punahou School President Jim Scott said in a statement. “She was an inspiring teacher, a visionary leader and a true friend.”

In 2011 the National Association of Independent Schools honored Staab with its Global Citizen Award for her contributions to global education. Two years later the Pacific and Asian Affairs Council recognized the Wo International Center with its Paul S. Bachman Award for having “contributed significantly to the improvement of relations between the United States and its neighbors in Asia and the Pacific.”

Born in Taiwan, Hope Kuo, whose father was a doctor with the World Health Organization, grew up in Korea, Samoa and Fiji, and those early experiences shaped her lifelong empathy for other cultures.

“She really had a passion for other cultures,” said her brother Louis Kuo. “Her love of learning took her around the world, but she always looked for the commonalities among people.”

A neighbor in Korea was from Kansas, so she gravitated to the University of Kansas, where she received a double Bachelor of Arts degree in linguistics and East Asian studies. She then came to Hawaii to pursue her master’s degree in English20140210_staab as a second language at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

She later acquired a second master’s in Chinese linguistics from UH-Manoa.

In 1976, her first year teaching at Punahou, she launched the school’s Mandarin Chinese language program and started its global languages after-school and summer school programs, which continue to serve students from throughout the community. She served as head of the Foreign Languages Department from 1986 to 1991.

She was married for several years, beginning in 1976, to Chris Staab, a Punahou English teacher.

Hope Staab was named a Joseph Klin­gen­stein Fellow in 1985-1986, a Rockefeller Foundation Fellow in 1987 and a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow in 1992. She served on the board of the Chinese Language Educators of Hawaii and of the national Chinese Language Teachers Association and, in 1992, was named Foreign Language Teacher of the Year by the Hawai‘i Association of Foreign Language Teachers.

Staab was appointed co-director of Wo International Center in 1995 and three years later became its director, a position she held for the next 15 years. Under her leadership the center expanded travel and study opportunities for students and teachers from Punahou and from the community; forged new partnerships with schools in China, Japan, Costa Rica and Ghana; and in 2010 launched the Student Global Leadership Institute, which each year convenes 79 students from eight countries to collaborate on global issues.

“She was a really loving mother and a mentor to so many people,” said daughter Janice Staab. “She really brought people together.”

Recalled daughter Malia Staab, “My mother always encouraged me to understand different cultures and that I should go to other places to see how their cultures are — what their good points are and what their bad points are; that we should not only understand our own culture; that we should have a global worldview.”

In addition to her daughters, Staab is survived by ex-husband Chris, mother T.H. Kuo, sisters Patricia Kuo and Betty Zito, brother Louis and nieces and nephews.

Memorial services will be held at 5:30 p.m. Feb. 18 at Thurston Memorial Chapel on the Punahou campus, with a reception to follow in the courtyard. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made to Punahou School in memory of Hope Kuo Staab.

Posted in Featured

Brandon Rodd: 1985-2014

Posted On February 15th, 2014 -

By Nick Abramo

The Hawaii football community lost one of its own on Friday when former Aiea and Arizona State standout offensive lineman Brandon Rodd died of a rare form of cancer. He was 28.

“I woke up this morning, hoping it was just a dream,” said Wendell Say, Rodd’s coach at Aiea. “I found out yesterday and it was a nightmare. It just shocked me. He was in the prime of his life. It makes you wonder. There’s guys out there who get iProject1_Layout-1n trouble and have big rap sheets and they live forever. And then the good kids who do the right things, they get taken away at a young age.”

Say mentioned that Rodd texted him about three weeks ago to tell him that he had some stomach pains and that it was so bad he was rushed to the hospital.

“He texted me every day, wanted to let me know that I was a big influence on his life (Rodd’s dad passed away when he was younger). He said he was going to go to chemo and was saying he was going to be all right.

“I’m kicking myself right now, though,” the longtime Na Alii coach said. “And I was just crying, reading his first text. I didn’t know it had gotten so bad.”

Rodd was a heavily recruited player, and it was somewhat of a surprise to some when he chose Arizona State over UH after graduating from Aiea in 2003. He was a three-time honorable mention All-Pac-10 left tackle and was named Pac-10 All-Academic four times. He also spent time with the Buffalo Bills and Oakland Raiders of the NFL.

“And he was such a beach boy,” Say said. “We never thought he would leave Hawaii because he was always surfing and paddling and at the beach. When he first started practicing with us, he was in surf shorts.”

According to Say, Rodd was engaged to be married and was working as a sales representative with a distribution company.

“He told me the NFL wasn’t what he expected,” Say said. “He said it was OK in Buffalo, but then in Oakland, the other players said they were there to help you, but it was cutthroat, guys wanting to help you until it’s time to keep their jobs and then they hate you. He wasn’t happy (about that).”

A few months after walking away from pro football, the 6-foot-4 Rodd dropped from 315 pounds to 250, Say said, and had gotten into running and was back doing what he always loved about Hawaii, surfing and paddling.

And he didn’t regret his decision.

“He loved football. He was a competitor,” Say said. “Knowing him, he was probably ignoring the pain for a long time, shrugging it off like kids shrug off pain to practice. I visited with his mom, Val, yesterday and she told me that he looked at the cancer like it was one more thing to fight through like he was fighting through another football game.

“Brandon was the type of person that if he said he was going to do something, he did it. He said he was going to go to college and start and he said he was going to go to the NFL and he did.”
Rodd graduated from ASU in 2007. He started 36 of the 37 games he played for the Sun Devils and competed in both the East-West Shrine Game and the Hula Bowl as a senior.

“One day, we went to see Brandon practicing for the Hula Bowl (at Aloha Stadium),” Say said. “Afterward, my daughter, who has epilepsy, had a seizure, and just to show you what kind of guy Brandon was, he would not leave until he knew everything was OK. He was such a great kid. He was a big guy, but he was always smiling.”

Rodd was a 2002 Star-Bulletin All-State first-team selection. Another of the five lineman chosen that year was Max Unger of Hawaii Prep, who won a Super Bowl with Seattle on Feb. 2.

Say said lots of Rodd’s Arizona State teammates have been calling Rodd’s family to offer their condolences.

Aside from Val, Rodd is survived by a brother, Jared, and two sisters, Aimee and Nicol.

Posted in Featured

Drew M. Scobie: 1988- 2014

Posted On February 10th, 2014 -

By William Cole

The ashes of a 25-year-old Hawaii National Guard soldier with a love of the ocean will be scattered in an aloha oe ceremony and paddle-out Sunday at Maka­puu Beach Park, one of his favorite surf spots, officials said.

Sgt. Drew M. Scobie of Kailua, a married father of a 4-year-old son, was killed along with a Wyoming soldier and a civilian in the crash of a twin-engine turboprop reconnaissance aircraft on a night mission in Af­ghani­stan on Jan. 10.

His wife, McKenna A.K. Panui-Scobie, is expecting their second child in June.

Memorial services for Scobie will be held Saturday at Hawaiian Memorial Park chapel, 45-425 Kame­ha­meha Highway, Kaneohe.

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Viewing will be from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. with a service to follow. A celebration of life lunch will take place at 2 p.m. at Senator Fong’s Plantation & Gardens, 47-285 Palama Road, Kaha­luu.

An aloha oe gathering will begin at 8:30 a.m. Sunday at Maka­puu Beach Park with a paddle-out at 10 a.m. Members of the community who wish to pay their respects are invited to attend.

Scobie was assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 1st Battalion, 487th Field Artillery, in Wahiawa, as a fire direction operator.

He volunteered to deploy to Af­ghani­stan with Detachment 55, which is providing reconnaissance and surveillance for ground forces in Af­ghani­stan. Detachment 55 was mobilized on Oct. 8 and deployed to Af­ghani­­stan later that month.

In Afghanistan, Scobie was an aerial sensor observer technician on a Medium Altitude Reconnaissance Surveillance System aircraft, which is based on a King Air 300.

“Drew said that he couldn’t be happier serving with such fine men and women,” the family said in a release developed with the Hawaii National Guard.

Scobie also worked as a perioperative technician aide at Straub Clinic & Hospital.

“In each of his career paths — both military and civilian — Drew excelled, while managing to be an outstanding family man as well,” the family said.

Scobie was born in San Francisco and moved to Kailua at age 3, his family said. He attended Kala­heo High School and George Washington High School in San Francisco.

“Drew enjoyed family time at the beach and was dedicated to teaching his son everything about the islands by sharing his passion for activities such as martial arts, football, paintball and his love for the ocean, which included surfing and body boarding,” the family said.

Scobie joined the 1/487th in 2009 as a tactical data systems specialist.

“He was eager to further his military education and specialized training, achieving multiple military occupational specialties and the rank of sergeant in just four years,” his family said.

Scobie is survived by his wife; son, Duke A.P. Scobie; mother, Karen K. Tao; father, Darryl Scobie; sister, Devan K. Scobie; brother, Jack M. Whiteted; stepbrother, Austin Whiteted; stepsisters, Portia Whiteted and Sara Whiteted; grandparents, Joyce and Ben Acma (grandfather Henry M. Tao is deceased) and Shirley and Daniel Scobie; and numerous aunts, uncles and cousins both in Hawaii and on the mainland.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests memorial donations be made in support of his children through the accounts In Memory of Drew Scobie at Bank of Hawaii, and www.GoFundMe.com.

Posted in Featured

Dee Edward Abe

Posted On February 19th, 2014 -

Feb. 12, 2014
Dee Edward Abe, 81, of Aiea, a retired U.S. Department of Agriculture animal health inspector and an Army veteran who served in the Korean War, died in Tripler Army Medical Center. He was born in Caldwell, Idaho. He is survived by wife Caroline K., sons Edward D. and Warren J., daughter Lisa L., brother Ray Kawamoto, sister Karen and two grandchildren. Visitation: 10:30 a.m. Tuesday at Hawaiian Memorial Park Mortuary. Services: 11 a.m. Burial: 1 p.m. at Hawaii State Veterans Cemetery, Kaneohe. Casual attire. Online condolences: hawaiifuneralservices.com.

Posted in Death Notices

Clinton Yoshitake Abe

Posted On February 20th, 2014 -

Feb. 7, 2014
Clinton Yoshitake Abe, 60, of Kailua, who was self-employed, died in Kailua. He was born in Honolulu. He is survived by parents George and Lynn, and sisters Jean Sumimoto, Gloria Chapman and Carol Abe. Private services.

Posted in Death Notices

Clinton Yoshitake Abe

Posted On February 20th, 2014 -

Feb. 7, 2014
Clinton Yoshitake Abe, 60, of Kailua, who was self-employed, died in Kailua. He was born in Honolulu. He is survived by parents George and Lynn, and sisters Jean Sumimoto, Gloria Chapman and Carol Abe. Private services.

Posted in Death Notices

James T. Abe

Posted On February 21st, 2014 -

Jan. 24, 2014
James T. Abe, 79, of Pearl City died in Aiea. He was born in Ewa. He is survived by wife Jean K.; sons Russell, Kevin and Garrett; daughter Sharyl Hazama; and five grandchildren. Private services.

Posted in Death Notices

Thomas Tomoitsu Abe

Posted On February 23rd, 2014 -

Feb. 17, 2014
Thomas Tomoitsu Abe, 98, of Kahului, a retired Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Co. payroll clerk and an Army veteran who served in the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, Company G, died in Hale Makua, Kahului. He was born in Honolulu. He is survived by son Alan, daughters Patricia Takatani and Sharon Uno, brother Shinsaku, sister Nora, seven grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Visitation: 9 a.m. March 4 at Nakamura Mortuary. Services: 10 a.m. Burial: 12:30 p.m. at Maui Memorial Park. Online condolences: nakamuramortuary.com.

Posted in Death Notices

Thomas Tomoitsu Abe

Posted On February 26th, 2014 -

Feb. 17, 2014
Thomas Tomoitsu Abe, 98, of Kahului, a retired Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Co. payroll clerk and an Army veteran who served in the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, Company G, died in Hale Makua Kahului. He was born in Honolulu. He is survived by son Alan, daughters Patricia Takatani and Sharon Uno, brother Shinsaku, sister Nora, seven grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Visitation: 9 a.m. Tuesday at Nakamura Mortuary. Services: 10 a.m. Burial: 12:30 p.m. at Maui Memorial Park. In lieu of flowers, donations suggested to Nisei Veteran Memorial Center. Online condolences: nakamuramortuary.com. Additional information for an obituary published Sunday.

Posted in Death Notices

Leopold A. Acio

Posted On February 7th, 2014 -

Jan. 31, 2014
Leopold A. Acio, 63, of Los Angeles, a medical coder for USC Medical Center in California, died in Los Angeles. He was born in Cabatuan, Isabela, Philippines. He is survived by wife Maria Q. Susa, son Joseph M. Jayven, brothers Nelson and Nestor, and sisters Julieta Cabacungan and Rita Felipe. Visitation: 6 p.m. Monday at Christ the King Catholic Church, Kahului. Additional visitation:
9 a.m. Tuesday at the church. Mass: 11 a.m. Cremation to follow. Online condolences: ballardfamilymortuaries.com.

Posted in Death Notices

Katherine Bacxa Agcaoili

Posted On February 1st, 2014 -

Jan. 1, 2014
Katherine Bacxa Agcaoili, 54, of Waipahu died in Waipahu. She was born in Honolulu. She is survived by mother Epigenia. Visitation: 8:30 a.m. Tuesday at St. Joseph Catholic Church, Waipahu. Mass: 9:30 a.m. Burial: 11 a.m. at Mililani Memorial Park. Casual attire. Flowers welcome.

Posted in Death Notices

Teruji Agena

Posted On February 12th, 2014 -

TERUJI AGENA 91, Passed away Jan. 26, at Kuakini Hospice. He was born in Lawai, Kauai. He was preceded in death by wife, Yuriko; brothers, Shokichi and James; sisters, Kameko Kaneshiro and Matsue Arakaki. Survived by sisters, Tsuruko Higa and Harriet Yap. Private services were held.

Benjamin Agonias

Posted On February 20th, 2014 -

Jan. 20, 2014
Benjamin “Gudin” Agonias, 61, of Waipahu died in Aiea. He was born in Sarrat, Ilocos Norte, Philippines. He is survived by wife Alma M.; sons Roy and German; daughters Floriete and Evangeline; brothers Hector, Leonardo and Edgar; sisters Elenor Malvar, Jovie Ganitano and Cristina Ancheta; and eight grandchildren. Visitation: 5:30 p.m. Monday at Mililani Mortuary-Waipio, makai chapel. Services: 6:30 p.m. Additional visitation: 8:30 a.m. Tuesday at St. Joseph Catholic Church, 94-675 Farrington Highway, Waipahu. Mass: 9:30 a.m. Burial: 11 a.m. at Mililani Memorial Park. Casual attire. Flowers welcome.

Posted in Death Notices

Benjamin Agonias

Posted On February 20th, 2014 -

Jan. 20, 2014
Benjamin “Gudin” Agonias, 61, of Waipahu died in Aiea. He was born in Sarrat, Ilocos Norte, Philippines. He is survived by wife Alma M.; sons Roy and German; daughters Floriete and Evangeline; brothers Hector, Leonardo and Edgar; sisters Elenor Malvar, Jovie Ganitano and Cristina Ancheta; and eight grandchildren. Visitation: 5:30 p.m. Monday at Mililani Mortuary-Waipio, makai chapel. Services: 6:30 p.m. Additional visitation: 8:30 a.m. Tuesday at St. Joseph Catholic Church, 94-675 Farrington Highway, Waipahu. Mass: 9:30 a.m. Burial: 11 a.m. at Mililani Memorial Park. Casual attire. Flowers welcome.

Posted in Death Notices

Alfred Agua

Posted On February 23rd, 2014 -

2-23-Alfred-AguaALFRED AGUA Age 78, peacefully passed away on February 13, 2014 with family and friends at his bedside and has joined our Heavenly Father. He was an aircraft mechanic at Hawaiian Airlines for 45 years and a graduate of Farrington High School Class of ’53. He was a wonderful husband, father, granddad, brother and uncle. His passion was “golfing.” He loved to run, travel, attend Saint Louis Crusader Football games and spend quality time with family. He was a generous, loving and compassionate man who did so much for others to see them succeed. Survived by son, Jason (Jan-Marie), two daughters Rona (John) Barsano and Melisa (Michael) Burton of California. Five grandchildren Tiana Lacar, Katelynn Barsano, Keoni Barsano, Joshua Agua and Jadyn Agua. Three sisters Eleanor Florendo, Shirley Suganuma (Mel) and Rosinda Auffrey. Visitation 8:30 am, Mass 11:00 am on Monday, March 3rd at St. Elizabeth Church in Aiea. Burial to follow at 12:30 pm at Mililani Memorial Park.

Alfredo Agua

Posted On February 26th, 2014 -

Feb. 13, 2014
Alfredo Agua, 78, of Aiea, a Hawaiian Airlines aircraft mechanic and an Air Force veteran, died in Honolulu. He was born in Makawao, Maui. He is survived by son Jason J.; daughters Rona R. Barsano and Melisa M. Burton; sisters Eleanor Florendo, Shirley Suganuma and Maria Auffrey; and five grandchildren. Visitation: 8:30 a.m. Monday at St. Elizabeth Catholic Church, 99-312 Moanalua Road, Aiea. Mass: 11 a.m. Burial: 12:30 p.m. at Mililani Memorial Park. Aloha attire. Flowers welcome.

Posted in Death Notices

Rosalina Cerenado Agustin

Posted On February 13th, 2014 -

Jan. 30, 2014
Rosalina Cerenado Agustin, 82, of Honolulu, a homemaker, died in Honolulu. She was born in Pamplona, Cagayan Valley, Philippines. She is survived by son Michael, daughter Linda Sato, four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Private services.

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Britta Yolande Akau

Posted On February 25th, 2014 -

Feb. 17, 2014
Britta Yolande Akau, 66, of Ewa Beach died in Ewa Beach. She was born in Holland. She is survived by husband Gordon. Services pending.

Posted in Death Notices

Abigail Kalaniwaimoe Akima

Posted On February 16th, 2014 -

Feb. 4, 2014
Abigail Kalaniwaimoe Akima, 85, of Lahaina, a former Naoki Steak House dishwasher, died in Maui Memorial Medical Center. She was born in Honolulu. She is survived by sons Laki Kaahumanu and Frank K. Akima Jr., daughters Katherine Kekahuna and Tasha Akima, brother Anthony Tony Smith, sister Theresa Gomez, 10 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Visitation: 6 p.m. Friday at Ballard Family Mortuary. Services: 7:30 p.m. Additional visitation: 8 a.m. Saturday at the mortuary. Services: 11 a.m. Burial:12:30 p.m. at Maui Memorial Park. Aloha attire. Online condolences: ballardfamilymortuaries.com.

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Peter Ahoe Akimo

Posted On February 11th, 2014 -

Jan. 30, 2014
Peter Ahoe Akimo, 86, of Kailua, a retired vice president and operations manager for Sun Van Moving Co., died in Castle Medical Center. He was born in Honolulu. He is survived by wife Pauline “Leinaalaz”; sons Peter III and George Akimo, and Michael and Kimo Palenapa; daughters Maile Collignon, Cindy Wilson, Mary Akimo-Luuwai and Brandy Akimo; sisters Thelma Maile and Leina Lewis; and three grandchildren. Visitation: 10 a.m. Friday at Borthwick Mortuary. Services: 11 a.m. Scattering of ashes at a later date. Casual attire. No flowers. Online condolences: borthwickoahu.com.

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Isaac Shoso Akita

Posted On February 7th, 2014 -

Dec. 30, 2013
Isaac Shoso Akita, 84, of Ocean City, Calif., formerly of Honolulu, a certified public accountant for Price Waterhouse in New York and a Kapiolani Community College teacher, died at home. He was born in Hawaii. He is survived by wife Edith, brothers George and Mark, and sister Mary N. Seriguchi. Private services.

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James K. Akiu

Posted On February 9th, 2014 -

Feb. 2, 2014
James K. Akiu, also known as “Uncle Jimmy” and “Uncle Kimo,” 82, of Haiku, Maui, died in Maui Memorial Medical Center. He was born on Maui. He is survived by hanai sister Blossom Diaz and guardian Connie Munoz. Visitation: 9 a.m. Friday at Borthwick Norman’s Mortuary. Burial at noon at Valley Isle Memorial Park, Haiku. Online condolences: ballardfamilymortuaries.com.

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Elizabeth Roselani Alama

Posted On February 26th, 2014 -

Feb. 22, 2014
Elizabeth Roselani “Betty” Alama, 84, of Ewa Beach, a retired registered nurse, died in St. Francis Hospice. She was born in Wailuku. She is survived by son Stanley Jr., daughters Rolenda “Kuulei” Alama-Francis and Mary E. “Malia” Villamil, brothers Joseph and Francis “Sonny” Asiu, seven grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Visitation: 9 a.m. Tuesday at Our Lady of Good Counsel Church. Mass: 11 a.m. Burial: 1 p.m. at National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, Punchbowl. Online condolences: leewardfuneralhome.com. Casual attire.

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- Denotes U.S. Military Veteran