Archive for April, 2014

ANITA HUFF

Posted On April 27th, 2014 -

ANITA HUFF Anita Huff, of Lihue, Kauai, age 70, passed away on March 30, 2014 in Lakewood Colorado. Anita was born June 25, 1943 in Kingston, New York. Anita was previously the Branch Manager of Meadow Gold Diaries, Kauai, then becoming the Distribution Manage for Gerry Baby Products, worldwide. She is survived by her sister, Janet Hagan (Amiel); brother, Albert Dusey Jr. (Judy); sons, Kevin Huff (Patti), Keith Huff (Shauna); daughter, Pamela Santistevan (Laurence); Grandchildren, Ronni Victorino (Weston), Lorenzo Santistevan, Cameron Santistevan, Oriana Huff, Ashley Huff, Kayla Huff, Manu and Caleb Pacanas, and Melissa Gladman, Great Grandchildren, Weston and Bronson Victorino, Talia Greenleaf, Eli Santistevan and numerous nephews, nieces, cousins, and her cats, Turbo and Sally. A memorial service will be held at Saint Raphael Church in Koloa on May 3, 2014. Visitation 10am – 10:45am, service to follow. A reception will follow the service at the church Hall

ANITA HUFF

Posted On April 28th, 2014 -

ANITA HUFF Anita Huff, of Lihue, Kauai, age 70, passed away on March 30, 2014 in Lakewood Colorado. Anita was born June 25, 1943 in Kingston, New York. Anita was previously the Branch Manager of Meadow Gold Diaries, Kauai, then becoming the Distribution Manage for Gerry Baby Products, worldwide. She is survived by her sister, Janet Hagan (Amiel); brother, Albert Dusey Jr. (Judy); sons, Kevin Huff (Patti), Keith Huff (Shauna); daughter, Pamela Santistevan (Laurence); Grandchildren, Ronni Victorino (Weston), Lorenzo Santistevan, Cameron Santistevan, Oriana Huff, Ashley Huff, Kayla Huff, Manu and Caleb Pacanas, and Melissa Gladman, Great Grandchildren, Weston and Bronson Victorino, Talia Greenleaf, Eli Santistevan and numerous nephews, nieces, cousins, and her cats, Turbo and Sally. A memorial service will be held at Saint Raphael Church in Koloa on May 3, 2014. Visitation 10am – 10:45am, service to follow. A reception will follow the service at the church Hall

Shimeji Ryusaki Kana­zawa: 1915-2014

Posted On April 19th, 2014 -

Invaluable devotion to Hawaii’s families spanned decades
By Leila Fujimori

Shimeji Ryusaki Kana­zawa, lauded for her 60-plus years of work for the elderly and youth, also is arguably Hawaii’s most unsung World War II hero.

Two months after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, amid anti-Japanese sentiments and fears within the Japanese community, Kanazawa, then a 26-year-old self-described “country girl” from Waimea, Hawaii island, was tapped to serve Japanese citizens in Hawaii as executive secretary to the Swedish vice consul, who had assumed the Japanese Consulate’s duties during the war.

“I dedicated my efforts to doing the best I could for families torn apart by the war — finding work for wives whose husbands had been interned, providing comfort to the elderly who shared their anguish with me, and accompanying families to internment camps to be with their husbands and fathers,” she said in a 2008 interview with Mary Bitterman.

Kanazawa died April 7 of natural causes in Honolulu at age 98.

“When we reflect on the second war, we so often think about the great heroes of the 100th Battalion, the 442nd Regimental Combat Team,” said longtime friend Bitterman. “I’ve thought of her as a representative of that generation, but on the women’s side, who was doing some incredible things. I think she stands as a real hero of what was called the greatest generation.”

Born Dec. 29, 1915, Kanazawa was the eldest of 11 children of Torazo and Saki Ryusaki, an auto mechanic and a picture bride from Shizuoka, from whom she learned Japanese. After graduating from Hilo High School in 1939, she worked as a secretary at Kohala High and Elementary School, and served as acting vice principal.

In February 1942, the Japanese consul was under house arrest, and neutral Sweden’s vice consul in Hawaii, Gustaf Olson, assumed his duties, handling matters concerning Japa­nese nationals, the Japanese Consulate’s website says.

He was looking for someone to run the consulate who could also minister to the needs of the Japanese community.

“She must speak Japa­nese, but more important to me is that I find a girl with a Red Cross heart,” Olson told his friend Eldon Morrell.

Morrell, director of the Vocational Division at the Department of Public Instruction, recommended Kanazawa, who had just been appointed division secretary in Honolulu. She had the “combination of heart and commitment,” he said.

Kanazawa was hired, sight unseen, and performed a range of duties.

She assisted Olson in inspecting ships transporting Japanese prisoners of war en route to the mainland to ensure living conditions followed the requirements of the Geneva Convention, as well as inspecting detention camps at Honouliuli and Sand Island to ensure detainees were treated properly.

When neighbor island families arrived in Honolulu awaiting ships to mainland internment camps, she supplied them with food and winter clothes bought with her own money, wrote Dorothea Dee Buckingham in 2010 for the Hawaii Reporter. She often stood at funerals and weddings for Japanese who were not permitted to travel to the neighbor islands, and assisted in the translation and preparation of official documents.

Bitterman said: “She was entrusted with top military secrets and had permission to travel among the islands in a manner unavailable to any other person of Japa­nese ancestry.”

She added, “She had a very difficult, very challenging job dealing with people who were really so saddened. The issei were frightened and didn’t know what was happening. Families were being torn asunder.

“She brought grace and compassion and a commitment to doing everything in her power to help people, and she was adored,” Bitterman said. “People would just be so moved to meet her because they had heard about her and her goodness and how she extended herself to make life bearable.”

For her wartime efforts, Kanazawa was awarded an American Red Cross certificate for “meritorious performance during World War II” and rewarded with a 37-state trip paid by the U.S. military, the Swedish government and the American Red Cross.

Upon her return to Hono­lulu, she met and married Kinji Kanazawa.

She accompanied him to Boston, where he attended Boston College Law School. There she attended the Chamberlain School of Retailing.

They returned to Hono­lulu, where her husband established his law practice, and she worked in retail, then for the Department of Education in cooperative retail training.

The couple had two children, and once they were in preschool, she embarked on a career in volunteer work, starting with her appointment to the Commission on Children and Youth by Gov. William Quinn.

After eight years, Kana­zawa shifted her focus to the elderly when Gov. John Burns appointed her in 1963 to the Commission on Aging. She maintained that focus for more than five decades until her death.

Twenty-five years ago, she conceived the idea for and co-founded Project Dana, based on the Buddhist precept of selfless giving. The volunteer program provides services for the frail elderly so they can continue to live at home and relief for their caregivers.

The project, begun in the Hawaii Buddhist community, developed into an interfaith program that has spread to California and Japan.

Her son, Sidney, said what also inspired his mother to do for others was her sister Emiko’s compassion for everyone else before her death at the age of 12.

The idea that “life could end at any time, and you needed to do as much as you can,” explained why she was always in a rush to get things done ahead of time, he said.

For Sidney Kanazawa, the greatest lesson learned from his mother was how she treated others.

“My mother made no distinction between blood relatives and friends,” he said. “They were all family.”

Her many true friends, who have kept in close contact, are her legacy, he said.

“She always seemed to see the good side of people and did a fantastic job of keeping family together,” he said. “She truly had no enemies, and made friends with everyone, including those who opposed her …making friends on different sides of the political spectrum.”

He added, “That’s why people gathered around her, because they could feel it. She loved and respected everyone. She found that there was a common human spirit. Everyone needed guidance and compassion and everybody needed love.”

Kanazawa is also survived by daughter Joni Young; two grandchildren, Kurt and Madeleine Kanazawa; sisters Hideko Maruyama and Fukue Yamamoto; and brothers Morris Inko Ryusaki and Dill Mutsuto Ryusaki.

Services for Kanazawa will be held 6 p.m. May 5 at the Honpa Hongwanji Mission. Visitation is at 5 p.m.

 

20-B4-KanazawaShimeji KanazawaAt age 26, she was hired by the Swedish consul in Hawaii to act as a liaison with Japanese nationals during World War II

20-B4-Shimeji-Kanazawa-2Shimeji Kanazawa, seated, was honored in 2013 for her decades of work advancing policies and programs that enhance the lives, safety and welfare of Hawaii’s elders and their caregivers during a ceremony in Gov. Neil Abercrombie’s office. Kanazawa died April 7 at age 98.

Posted in Featured

WILLIAM M. BOLMAN / 1929-2014

Posted On April 30th, 2014 -

Autism advocate inspired with vision, leadership

By Rosemarie Bernardo / rbernardo@staradvertiser.com

Dr. William “Bill” M. Bolman, a well-respected expert on autism, pushed to raise awareness of the disorder and of the need for more treatment and insurance coverage for patients.

Bolman, co-founder of the Autism Society of Hawaii, died in Honolulu on April 18. He was 84.

Until his last days Bolman served as president of the society, continued to see patients and testified at the state Legislature in support of a measure to provide insurance coverage for screening, diagnosis and treatment of autism. 30-B8-Bolman-mug-NEW

Dr. Ryan Lee, newly elected president of the Autism Society, said, “His kindness and vision to see what could be possible in the field of autism was very inspiring to me.”

“We are trying to continue his legacy through the Autism Society of Hawaii,” he said. “His impact to the community was enormous.”

Louis Erteschik, executive director of the Hawaii Disability Rights Center, said Bolman was a beloved figure and considered a patriarch to many psychiatrists. “He pretty much taught all of the psychiatrists in town,” Erteschik said.

Family members and colleagues said he would be best remembered for his commitment to treating children with autism, medical professionals he taught and his tireless work with autism. “He was just the best,” Erteschik said.

Born in Elyria, Ohio, and raised in Gloversville, N.Y., Bolman graduated from Harvard College in 1951 and Harvard Medical School in 1955. He earned a master’s degree in public health, specializing in child psychiatry and developing an expertise in autism.

Bolman completed his residency at Massachusetts Memorial Hospital in Boston and Boston City Hospital. While in the Army, he served at Tripler Army Medical Center before returning to Massachusetts. He worked in various cities before he returned to Honolulu.

Bolman served as a consultant to the World Health Organization and National Institute of Mental Health as well as state health departments and organizations. He also was a teaching fellow at Tufts University and Boston University and served as a professor at the University of Wisconsin and University of Hawaii John A. Burns School of Medicine.

Bolman was a lifetime fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, the World Federation for Mental Health and the Royal Society for Public Health. His contributions to the community include helping to establish the ‘Imi Ho‘ola program that supports disadvantaged students at JABSOM.

Bolman’s wife of 33 years, Victoria Asayama, described her husband as a humble gentleman who wanted to help others and the community on a daily basis. “He was just a giving soul,” she said.

Bolman is also survived by daughters Dr. Susan Garrison Bolman and Elizabeth Stinette Bolman, nephews and nieces.

A celebration of life for Bolman will be held May 31 at Nuuanu Memorial Park and Mortuary. Visitation starts at 10 a.m. with service to follow at 11 a.m. Lei and personal notes are welcome. Donations to the Autism Society of Hawaii are suggested.

Posted in Featured

Hobie Alter: 1933-2014

Posted On April 1st, 2014 -

Innovator’s designs brought surfing, sailing to masses

When he was a young man, Hobie Alter had a clear vision of his future: He didn’t want a job that would require hard-soled shoes, and he didn’t want to work east of Pacific Coast Highway.

He succeeded.

The son of an orange grower, Alter is credited with innovations that allowed people who couldn’t lift log slabs to surf and those who couldn’t pay for yacht club memberships to sail.

Known practically everywhere with a coastline or a lake simply as “Hobie,” Alter developed the mass-produced foam surfboard. He later popularized sailing by inventing a lightweight, high-performance catamaran.

He died Saturday at his home in Palm Desert, Calif., according to an announcement posted on www.hobie.com, his company’s website. He was 80.

Alter was diagnosed with cancer about five years ago and since then had serious health problems, said Paul Holmes, author of “Hobie: Master of Water, Wind and Waves,” a 2013 biography.

Born Hobart Laidlaw Alter in Ontario, Calif., he designed a prize-winning kite at age 5.

A self-taught design innovator and entrepreneur, Alter was a reluctant businessman who wore cutoffs instead of suits and was guided by his imagination above all else.

“I’m making money producing things that give me pleasure, doing exactly what I want to do,” Alter told a reporter in 1977. “I guess I’m really lucky that way.”

There were only several hundred surfers lugging their heavy wood boards into the waters of Southern Cali­for­nia in 1958 when Alter and then-partner Gordon “Grubby” Clark perfected the delicate chemical process of making rough-cut polyurethane foam blanks that could be custom-shaped in less than an hour.

Initially dismissed as flimsy toys, Hobie’s lightweight boards caught on. In less than a year, wood boards that had been used since Hawaiians invented the sport were obsolete.

Alter’s timing couldn’t have been better. The following year, the movie “Gidget” introduced the nation to a fun-loving Cali­for­nia subculture. Interest in the sport surged.

Soon his Dana Point workshop was pumping out 250 boards a week and became the epicenter of Cali­for­nia’s burgeoning surf culture.

Alter licensed the Hobie name to new surf shops in San Diego, Hawaii, Peru and on the East Coast, and sponsored a team of professional surfers, including Phil Edwards, Joey Cabell and Corky Carroll. All got their names on “signature” Hobie surfboards — another business innovation that spurred sales.

The Hobie brand dominated the surfboard business into the 1970s. Today the foam-core board remains the standard for an industry Alter arguably helped create.

“He is one of the pillars on which the sport of surfing is built,” said Steve Pezman, a surfing historian and publisher of the Surfer’s Journal. “He was enamored with inventing things. He’d get interested in something, see how it could be improved and go make a better version of it.”

In the mid-1960s, with his surfboard business booming, Alter turned to a new hobby: sailing.

As with wooden surfboards, Alter discerned an inherent problem with his 600-pound catamaran: It took at least four people to haul it to the water.

After more than a year of experimentation, Alter unveiled the Hobie Cat. The 14-foot catamaran was light enough for one person to carry and small enough to tow or even strap onto a car.

“He totally democratized sailing,” said Holmes, Alter’s biographer. “Prior to the late 1960s, it had been the preserve of a pretty elite group. But then you could get a fully rigged Hobie 14 for $999 — with the trailer.”

The original Hobie Cat and subsequent models did for sailing what the foam-core board had done for surfing: made a niche sport accessible to the masses.

“The yacht clubs were really down on the catamaran because here was some guy with a little investment going faster than they were in their million-dollar boats,” Alter told the Surfer’s Journal in 2009.

Alter sold his catamaran company to Coleman Corp. for $3.6 million in 1976 and turned to other projects.

He developed a radio-controlled glider dubbed the Hobie Hawk. He introduced a line of skateboards. He designed new watercraft, including the popular Hobie 33, a quick and agile racing monohull.

And he entered into international licensing deals that lent his name to lines of swimsuits, sportswear and sunglasses he designed.

In the early 1990s Alter literally sailed away to a retirement place in the San Juan Islands in Washington state on a 60-foot diesel catamaran he built himself.

Alter’s survivors include wife Susan, sons Hobie Jr. and Jeff, daughter Paula, sisters Caro­lyn and Lillian, eight grandchildren and a great-granddaughter.

Mike Anton, Los Angeles Times

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Posted in Featured

H.K. Bruss Keppeler: 1937-2014

Posted On April 24th, 2014 -

Lawyer promoted rights of Native Hawaiians

H.K. Bruss Keppeler, 77, an attorney known for his dedication to preserving Hawaiian culture, heritage and way of life, died April 12 in Hono­lulu.

For many years Keppeler worked with U.S. Sen. Daniel Akaka’s staff on the Akaka Bill — a Native Hawaiian federal recognition bill. In 2011, Keppeler also worked with state senators on passage of Senate Bill 1520, which created the commission responsible for creating and maintaining a list of Native Hawaiians tasked with working toward the organization of a native government.

Keppeler established Na ‘Oiwi Kane — the first Native Hawaiian “disadvantaged” business eligible for government contracts through the Small Business Administration — with Ronald K. Jarrett.

He was vice president and general counsel of JTSI Inc. and a director of the Kepler Group Inc. Keppeler was a graduate of Punahou School and the University of Washington, where he earned a Bachelor of Arts and a law degree.

In the “Price of Paradise,” Keppeler wrote a Native Hawaiian claims article and, with Mahealani Kamauu, co-authored the Hawaiian sovereignty article.

He served on the boards of the Bishop Museum Association, Friends of ‘Iolani Palace, Moana­lua Gardens, Na ‘Oiwi Kane, University of Hawaii-Manoa Charles R. Hem­en­way Scholarship Program and the Native Hawaiian Chamber of Commerce. He was also a member of The Royal Order of Kame­ha­meha I and the Hawaiian Civic Clubs of Hono­­lulu and Prince Kuhio, and Mamaka ‘Ai alo. He served as adviser to the Native Hawaiian Roll Commission and was appointed commissioner on the Hawaii Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.

Survivors include partner M.J. Fogarty, brother John P. “Jack” Keppeler II, sister Leinani Keppeler-Bortles, six nieces and two nephews.

Visitation is at 9 a.m. Wednesday at the Cathedral of Saint Andrew, followed by services at 10:30 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations are suggested to Friends of ‘Iolani Palace, Punahou School, Bishop Museum, Prince Kuhio Civic Club and Cathedral of Saint Andrew.

Post memories at bruss.keppeler.muchloved.com.

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Posted in Featured

Dennis Kamakahi: 1953-2014

Posted On April 28th, 2014 -

Slack-key master revered as a music legend
By Michael Tsai

Multiple news organizations are reporting that local entertainer Dennis Kama­kahi has died at the age of 61.

A Facebook entry attributed to Kama­kahi’s son David announced Kama­kahi’s death, saying in part:

“Hawaii has lost one of its greatest sons today. Legendary musician & composer, loving husband, father, and grandfather, Dennis David Kama­­kahi, passed away at the Queens Medical Center at 4:30 p.m. After his battle with cancer, he was surrounded by family and close friends, with the background filled with the music of Gabby Pahi­nui and The Sons of Hawaii. We cried, we prayed, we laughed, we sang for him his many songs that he wrote and also favorites of his own.”

Reached via a telephone number on the team­den­nis­kama­kahi.com website, which had been used to promote a benefit concert for Kama­kahi on March 31, David Kama­kahi declined to confirm his father’s death Monday.

In the Facebook posting, the family asked for privacy and noted that any updates would be posted on the website.

Kamakahi’s friends, family and fans reacted swiftly to the news of his death on a variety of social media sites.

Singer Amy Hanai­ali‘i tweeted, ”I am so sad to hear of the passing of my dear cousin Dennis Kama­kahi. He will always be an inspiration to me, in mele, true aloha and hawaiian (sic) spirituality. May our ancestors carry you to your peaceful place with Akua … love you cousin.”

A renowned slack-key guitar player and prolific songwriter, Kama­kahi garnered numerous recognitions in a career spanning more than four decades. He contributed to three Grammy Award-winning recordings (“Legends of Hawaiian Slack Key Guitar” in 2007, “Treasures of Hawaiian Slack Key Guitar” in 2008 and “The Masters of Hawaiian Slack Key Guitar” in 2010) and won six Na Hoku Hano­­hano Awards.

Kamakahi’s seminal work with the Sons of Hawaii (he replaced Gabby Pahi­nui in 1974) earned him a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Hawaii Academy of Recording Arts in 2009. He was inducted to the Hawaiian Music Hall of Fame that same year.

Kamakahi, a Christian minister, was diagnosed with stage 4 lung cancer in March while undergoing treatment for pneumonia.

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Posted in Featured

KENNETH WAYNE ABRAMS

Posted On April 13th, 2014 -

4-13 KENNETH WAYNE ABRAMSKENNETH WAYNE ABRAMS Age 58, of Babylon, New York, passed away on April 4, 2014 in Honolulu. Owner of General Printing and KWA Communications, LLC. He is survived by his daughter, Zoe Abrams. Kenny graduated from Stonybrook University with a degree in English Literature. Lifetime fan of the NY Giants and Yankees, Kenny never missed watching a game. A true New Yorker, his ashes will be scattered in Montauk, New York next month. I will miss you daddy. Love, Zoe

Kenneth Wayne Abrams

Posted On April 14th, 2014 -

April 4, 2014
Kenneth Wayne “Kenny” Abrams, 58, of Honolulu, owner of General Printing and KWA Communications, died. He was born in Long Island, N.Y. He is survived by daughter Zoe Abrams and parents Allan Abrams and Elizabeth Cummins. Private services to be held in New York.

Posted in Death Notices

Henry Acedillo

Posted On April 29th, 2014 -

April 18, 2014
Henry “Naka” Acedillo, 78, of Hawi, Hawaii, a retired construction heavy equipment operator and an Army veteran, died at home. He was born in Kohala, Hawaii. He is survived by wife Betty; son Lawrence; daughters Stephanie Hanano and Leslie Ashimine; brothers Zoilo Kupukaa, Manuel Acedillo and Walter Rickard Jr.; sister Violet Lee; four grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. Private services.

Posted in Death Notices

Claudio Castillio Acoba

Posted On April 24th, 2014 -

April 7, 2014
Claudio Castillio Acoba, 83, of Waipahu, a procurement officer and an Air Force veteran, died in Waipahu. He was born in Wailuku. He is survived by son Claude C., daughter Claudette Bowie, brother Primo, two grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Inurnment: 3 p.m. Tuesday at National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, Punchbowl. Online condolences: borthwickoahu.com.

Posted in Death Notices

Ruth Kee Up Adversalo

Posted On April 12th, 2014 -

March 17, 2014
Ruth Kee Up Adversalo, 91, of Honolulu, owner of Rumel’s Jewelry and Gifts Store, died in Honolulu. She was born in Mana, Kauai. She is survived by husband Meliton, son John, daughters Kathleen Ramento and Suzanne Lott, and four grandchildren. Visitation: 9 a.m. April 19 at Borthwick Mortuary. Services: 10 a.m. Burial: 1 p.m. at Hawaiian Memorial Park. Aloha attire. Online condolences: borthwickoahu.com.

Posted in Death Notices

RUTH KEE UP ADVERSALO

Posted On April 12th, 2014 -

4-12 RUTH KEE UP ADVERSALORUTH KEE UP ADVERSALO April 1922-March 2014 Ruth Kee Up Adversalo, 91, of Honolulu passed away peacefully at home on March 17, 2014 after a brief illness. Ruth was born in Mana, Kauai on April 22, 1922 and was the owner of Rumel’s Jewelry and Gifts store. She is survived by her husband Meliton, daughters Kathleen Ramento and Suzanne Lott, son John Adversalo, and 4 grandchildren; brother, Tong Chun Lee, and sister, Que Sun Oshiba. Celebration of life: Saturday, April 19. Aloha Attire. 9:00 a.m. visitation, 10:00 a.m. service and reception Borthwick Mortuary, Mauka Chapel. 1:00 p.m. – Burial at Hawaiian Memorial Park.

Dora-Lee Ululani Afong

Posted On April 8th, 2014 -

March 22, 2014
Dora-Lee Ululani “Missy” Afong, 57, of Waimanalo, a dance teacher at New Hope Kailua Halau, teacher’s aide for Blanche Pope and Kapunahala elementary schools, and a state Child Welfare Services employee, died in Wai­ma­nalo. She was born in Honolulu. She is survived by husband Kenneth; sons Keith, James and Daryl; daughter Kennedine “Kalei”; hanai son Charles Comer III; hanai daughter Erica Salsedo; brothers Paul and Russell Pakele; sisters Marilyn Pakele, Cindy Kauihana, Pauline “Lei” and Bonnie Garcia, and Paula Poahi; and 11 grandchildren. Visitation: 2 p.m. Sunday at Nuuanu Memorial Park & Mortuary. Services: 4 p.m. Casual attire. No flowers.

Posted in Death Notices

Catherine Ibera Agbayani

Posted On April 17th, 2014 -

March 27, 2014
Catherine Ibera Agbayani, 43, of Honolulu, a Straub Clinic & Hospital registered nurse, died in Honolulu. She was born in Honolulu. She is survived by parents Juan and Concepcion, brothers Eddie and Danilo, and sisters Maribeth George and Josephine Alonso. Visitation: 5:30 p.m. Tuesday at Hawaiian Memorial Park Mortuary. Services: 6:15 p.m. Additional visitation: 9:30 a.m. Wednesday at Valley of the Temples Memorial Park Chapel. Mass: 11 a.m. Burial at noon at the cemetery. Online condolences: hawaiianmemorialparkmortuary.com.

Posted in Death Notices

Rodolfo Gano Agmata

Posted On April 24th, 2014 -

April 2, 2014
Rodolfo Gano “Rudy” Agmata, 74, of Pearl City, a retired state Department of Agriculture carpenter and former construction laborer, died in Pearl City. He was born in Sarrat, Ilocos Norte, Philippines. He is survived by wife Mariesa “Mary”; son Romar; daughters Madelyn Gascon, Cherilyn Fonoti and Carolyn Savea; brothers Martin, Rogelio and Rodrigo; sisters Marina Sigua and Consolacion Valdez; and 10 grandchildren. Visitation: 5:30 p.m. Tuesday at Hawaiian Memorial Park Mortuary. Services: 6:30 p.m. Additional visitation: 9 a.m. Wednesday at the mortuary. Services: 11 a.m. Burial at noon at Valley of the Temples. Online condolences: hawaiianmemorialparkmortuary.com.

Posted in Death Notices

Berlito Marzan Agsaoay

Posted On April 29th, 2014 -

March 30, 2014
Berlito Marzan Agsaoay, 68, of Honolulu, a retired Hilton Hawaiian Village steward and a CenPac Properties employee, died in Honolulu. He was born in San Quintin, Pangasinan, Philippines. He is survived by wife Alicia; son Rolando; daughters Bernadeth and Mylene; brother Florentino Jr.; sisters Fellomina Agsaoay-Talon, Lorenza Agsaoay-Ambrocioi and Emma Agsaoay-Tabutaco; and four grandchildren. Visitation: 5:30 p.m. Wednesday at Mililani Mortuary-Waipio, mauka chapel. Services: 6:30 p.m. Additional visitation: 9 a.m. Thursday at the mortuary. Services: 10 a.m. Burial: 11 a.m. at Mililani Memorial Park. Flowers welcome.

Posted in Death Notices

Berlito Marzan Agsaoay

Posted On April 30th, 2014 -

March 30, 2014
Berlito Marzan Agsaoay, 68, of Honolulu, a retired Hilton Hawaiian Village steward and CenPac Properties Inc. employee, died in Honolulu. He was born in San Quintin, Pangasinan, Philippines. He is survived by wife Alicia; son Rolando; daughters Bernadeth and Mylene; brother Florentino Jr.; sisters Fellomina Agsaoay-Talon, Lorenza Agsaoay-Ambrocio and Emma Agsaoay-Tabutaco; and four grandchildren. Visitation: 5:30 p.m. Wednesday at Mililani Mortuary-Waipio, mauka chapel. Services: 6:30 p.m. Additional visitation: 9 a.m. Thursday at the mortuary. Services: 10 a.m. Burial: 11 a.m. at Mililani Memorial Park. Flowers welcome. Incorrect information in an obituary published Tuesday.

Posted in Death Notices

Gilbert Paul Aguiar

Posted On April 3rd, 2014 -

March 31, 2014
Gilbert Paul Aguiar, 84, of Hilo, a retired heavy equipment operator and mechanic at the former Theo H. Davies Co. and Pacific Machinery, died in Hilo Medical Center. He was born in Hilo. He is survived by wife Leilani, son Curtis, daughter Sharon Butler, brother George, five grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Visitation: 9 a.m. Wednesday at Dodo Mortuary. Services: 11 a.m. Burial to follow at Homelani Memorial Park. Casual attire.

Posted in Death Notices

ROWENA HONAN AHAKUELO

Posted On April 20th, 2014 -

4-20 Rowena AhakueloROWENA HONAN AHAKUELO November 19, 1935 – April 4, 2014 Rowena Anne Haunani Honan Ahakuelo was born in Honolulu to Michael and Sweetie Honan. Rowena was a proud graduate of Sacred Hearts Convent and the Maryknoll High School Class of 1953. She credited the Sisters for giving her the Spiritual blueprint by which she lived her life. As a young woman, Rowena danced hula for Ruby Ahakuelo’s hula studio. She was known for her graceful rendition of Kalua from the movie, Bird of Paradise. In 1954, Rowena married the love of her life, Norman Ahakuelo. Their 49 year partnership was blessed with love, respect and loyalty. Rowena devoted her life to her family. She was our teacher, confidante, cheerleader, and friend. She offered unconditional love, support and friendship to all. Throughout her life, Rowena relished her role as mother and grandma to her children, grandchildren, and many of their friends. She found great joy in cooking her delicious beef stew and chicken long rice. Rowena lived a wonderful life surrounded by her family’s love and joy. She will always be our angel. Rowena is survived by her children, Aonani Ahakuelo- Chernisky (Joseph), Maile V Cavaco (Ryan), Kevin, Brian (Marilyn), Christian (Kalena), and Michael, 14 grandchildren, 18 great-grandchildren and sisters, Loretta Sua and Marilyn McGuire. We extend our heartfelt aloha to the nursing staff who lovingly cared for mom and the good Sisters who provided Rowena with spiritual support at St. Francis Hospice West. Private services held. Memorial donations in Rowena’s name can be made to St. Francis Hospice.

Aaron Ahn

Posted On April 24th, 2014 -

March 20, 2014
Aaron Ahn, 81, of Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, a retired Hawaii Department of Education teacher and an Army veteran, died in Honolulu. He was born in Waimea, Kauai. He is survived by wife Tomie, son Alan, daughter Kathleen Shirakawa, brother Stanley, sister Almira Lum and five grandchildren. Private services.

Posted in Death Notices

Quintin Gary John Aiona

Posted On April 7th, 2014 -

March 28, 2014
Quintin Gary John Aiona, 54, of Hilo died in Hilo Medical Center. He was born in Hilo. He is survived by wife Myrna; sons Kala’i and Kelekolio; daughter Nawahine’opio; brothers Tommy, James, Mark and Patrick Sr.; sisters Jane Aganus, Billie Baclig, Joanne Peralta and Cosie Sasaki; and five grandchildren. Visitation: 3:30 p.m. Thursday at Malia Puka o Kalani Catholic Church, 326 Desha Ave., Keaukaha. Services: 4:30 p.m. Mass: 5 p.m. Casual attire.

Posted in Death Notices

Mary M.K. Akana

Posted On April 4th, 2014 -

March 20, 2014
Mary M.K. Akana, 58, of Waianae died in Honolulu. She was born in Kohala, Hawaii. She is survived by sons Clement K., Anthony K. and Palani Mahiai; brother William Kahuanui; sisters Penelope and Lea Kahuanui; five grandchildren; and a great-grandchild. Private services.

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Brian Bronson Ku’umakaekolu Akana

Posted On April 14th, 2014 -

April 6, 2014
Brian Bronson Ku’umakaekolu Akana, 59, of Pearl City, a former commercial door installer for Commercial Shelving, died in St. Francis Hospice in Nuuanu. He was born in Honolulu. He is survived by son David, mother Janette and sister Cindy Uilani Cameron. Private services held. Online condolences: kenordensteinfunerals.com.

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Joyce Emma Akana

Posted On April 16th, 2014 -

April 10, 2014
Joyce Emma Akana, 77, of Kapaau, Hawaii, a homemaker, cook at Luke’s Restaurant, server at McDonald’s in Waimea, Hawaii, and receptionist at Sunshine Helicopters, died at home. She was born in Kohala, Hawaii. She is survived by daughters Brendalynn Owens, Cecelia Souza, Dena Soares, Celeste Keyes, Jadelyn Hoopai, Johanna Walker and Rowena Kanaha; hanai son Sam Kaeo; hanai daughter Shirley Tomei; brother Henry Jr.; sister Olivia Teramoto; 25 grandchildren; and 31 great-grandchildren. Visitation: 8 a.m. Monday at Seventh-day Adventist Church, Hawi, Hawaii. Services: 10 a.m. Burial to follow at Hawi County Cemetery. Casual attire. Flowers welcome.

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Lucille Maria Aki

Posted On April 12th, 2014 -

March 29, 2014
Lucille Maria “Pi’ilani” Aki, 59, of Hilo, an educational assistant, vice principal and parent community networking coordinator at Chiefess Kapiolani Elementary School, died. She was born in Hilo. She is survived by daughter Corinne Inada-Aki, hanai daughter Karen Ikeda, brothers Ernest Kahili and Ronald “Kehaulani” Kekoa, and sisters Eva Inada and Antoinette “Toni” Kaipo. No services.

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Cecil Ambrose Akina

Posted On April 4th, 2014 -

March 30, 2014
Cecil Ambrose Akina, 62, of Honolulu, a construction worker, died in Honolulu. He was born in Honolulu. He is survived by brothers Theodore F., Cyril B. and Stanislaus P.; and sisters Ursula P.T. Warren and Angela M.B. Floeter. Visitation: 5 p.m. Thursday at Borthwick Mortuary. Services: 6 p.m. Inurnment: 10:30 a.m. April 11 at Diamond Head Memorial Park. Aloha and casual attire. Flowers welcome. Online condolences: borthwickoahu.com.

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Gladys K. Akina

Posted On April 24th, 2014 -

March 29, 2014
Gladys K. Akina, 89, of Honolulu died. She was born in Honolulu. She is survived by sons Gary, Robin and Duane; and 10 grandchildren. Private services. Online condolences: oahumortuary.com.

Posted in Death Notices

Yoko Akutagawa

Posted On April 29th, 2014 -

April 6, 2014
Yoko Akutagawa, 90, of Honolulu, a retired Pacific Sportswear seamstress, died in Maluhia Hospital. She was born in South Hilo. She is survived by sisters May Moriyama and Helen Nakabayashi, and caregiver Gail Okaneku. Services: 6 p.m. Sunday at Nuuanu Memorial Park & Mortuary. Aloha attire. No flowers.

Posted in Death Notices

Leilani Virginia Alama

Posted On April 11th, 2014 -

April 4, 2014
Leilani Virginia Alama, also known as “Auntie Lei” and “Rara,” 88, of Honolulu, a kumu hula, will be remembered in services 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at Diamond Head Mortuary. She died in Ewa Beach. She was born in Honolulu. She is survived by sister Puanani. Visitation: 5:30 p.m. Wednesday at the mortuary. Burial: 10 a.m. Thursday at Hawaiian Memorial Park. Online condolences: hawaiianmemorialparkmortuary.com. Additional information for an obituary published Wednesday.

Posted in Death Notices

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