Archive for the ‘Family Placed Obituaries’ Category

KENNETH FRANCIS KAMUOKALANI BROWN

Posted On February 12th, 2014 -

2-12 KENNETH BROWN b&wKENNETH FRANCIS KAMUOKALANI BROWN 28 October 1919- February 2014 Kenneth Francis Kamuokalani Brown was a son of Hawai’i. In the era that brought Hawai’i into the modern world, he played many roles. He saw and took part in the events that have shaped Hawaiian history-from World War II, statehood, the rise of the Democratic Party, the ascendance of the tourist industry, the establishment of environmentalism, and the rediscovery of Hawaiian culture, to the definition of the new sovereignty movement. For some, he has been a kupuna, a living point of contact with the values of a unique culture, now largely transformed. A rich resource for the recovery and reconsideration of that culture, he supported the Hawaiian renaissance in many of its manifestations. For some, he was a political leader, a model for a Hawaiian politics in an era of new social commitments. In seeking to serve the people and the islands in public contexts, he self-consciously took up the responsibilities of the traditional ali’i. For some, he was a patron of the arts and of culture, an architect who used a Hawaiian sense of place to promote an indigenous aesthetic. And for many, he was a mentor, a friend of unusual depth, integrity, and durability, who extended his aloha to an ‘ohana that reaches from Hawai’i through the Pacific and beyond the edges of our ocean of islands to the continents on either side. Born at his family home, Ainamalu, in Ka’alawai on the slopes of Diamond Head on October 28, 1919, Kenneth Brown came into a mixed-if not divided-cultural world of his own. His mother, Julia Davis Long White, was the offspring of a prominent New England family whose patriarch was Nelson Davis White, a factory-owner in Winchendon, Massachusetts. Julia was a woman of strong views and distinctive character, but she remained far from home, in some ways, for her whole adult life. His father, George I’i Brown, was the grandson of John Papa I’i, a distinguished public figure of nineteenth-century Hawai’i. John I’i was assigned by Kamehameha I as a boyhood companion of Liholiho, and became a central influence upon the complex cultural and political adjustments by which the Kingdom of Hawai’i and the Hawaiian people encountered the pressures of a wider world. John I’i was an influential member of the court of Kamehameha III, taking on various public roles; he served in the Privy Council, the House of Nobles, and the House of Representatives, and as Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of Hawai’i. He was a key figure in the design of the 1848 Great Mahele, and one of the drafters of the Constitution of 1852. George I’i Brown and Francis Hyde I’i Brown, Kenneth Brown’s father and uncle, both followed the tradition of public service established in the family since the days of the monarchy. George Brown was president of the territorial Board of Commissioners of Agriculture and Forestry, and a regent of the University of Hawai’i. Francis Brown was a very visible political, business, and sports figure in the islands, serving for many years as a member of the territorial Senate. Notably, in 1939, Francis Brown took a public stand against the administration of the Kamehameha Schools by the Bishop Estate, urging the appointment of Hawaiians or part-Hawaiians to the board of trustees, and arguing strongly that the school should better serve Hawaiian youth, following “the chief concern of the beloved Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop.” Kenneth Brown moved geographically between two worlds, when, as a child and young adult, he traveled with his mother and elder brothers, George and Zadoc, between New England and Honolulu. Though he attended Punahou School in his earliest years, he obtained most of his schooling not in Honolulu, but in New England, first at Hotchkiss School, and then at Princeton University, where he graduated magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa in 1941. During World War II, he served as a civilian architect for the U. S. Army Engineers in the War Emergency Headquarters on Maui and O’ahu. And following the war, he opened his own architectural firm, working actively on public and private projects. On March 8, 1947, Brown married Joan Elizabeth Schaefer, daughter of F. A. Schaefer, Jr., and Kathryn Walker. Joan’s family also has a long-established history in Hawai’i. Her great grandfather, George Morrison Robertson, a Scotsman by birth, was an established figure in the islands by 1850, when he was appointed judge of the Circuit Court of the Island of Hawai’i. In the course of a long and influential life in public service, and as a close advisor of Kamehameha IV, Robertson held many positions in the Kingdom of Hawai’i. He served, along with John I’i, as associate justice of the Supreme Court; he was vice-president of the Land Commission; and he too played a major role in the Great Mahele. Robertson served on the King’s Privy Council, as Minister of the Interior, Representative and Speaker of the House, and as a charter member of the Queen’s Hospital. Frederick August Schaefer, Joan’s grandfather, was the patriarch of another successful kama’aina family. He emigrated from Germany to Hawai’i in 1858, and became the proprietor of an increasingly diversified business, F. A. Schaefer and Company, an export-import firm that eventually absorbed the Honoka’a Sugar Company, the Pacific Sugar Mill, and the Hawaiian Irrigation Company. Kenneth and Joan brought up three children-Laura Schaefer Brown, Frances Hyde I’i Brown White, and Bernice Victoria Brown Johnston. Two have now made their lives far from Hawai’i, but all of them carry the spirit of their home place with them everywhere, in their hearts. Kenneth and Joan’s family extends to include two sons-in-law and ten grandchildren: Laura’s children-Ana I’i Brown-Cohen, Jonah Isaac Brown-Cohen, and Lawrence Schaefer Brown-Cohen; Frances’s husband Philip Kniskern White and their children-Kenneth John I’i White, Philip Brown White, and Francis I’i Kniskern White; and Bernice’s husband Michael Hunt Johnston and their children-Josephine Kiyomi Johnston, Everett Kahalelaukoa Johnston, Samuel I’i Brown Johnston, and Reynolds Palani Johnston. Brown’s career in business and politics, architecture and culture, seems like the life of several people, rather than one individual. He embarked and reembarked on new ventures, over a long course of sustained engagement with Hawai’i and its people. Perhaps most significant for his own sense of himself and his contribution to the islands was his tenure as chair of the Board of Trustees of the Queen’s Health Systems in Honolulu in the decade of the late 1980s and early 1990s, where he took up the mission of what he called the “rededication” of the hospital to Queen Emma’s original vision. That vision had emerged from the tragedy of the Hawaiian contact with the world beyond the islands, which resulted in the death by disease of probably nine out of ten Hawaiians in the Queen’s own lifetime. For Queen Emma and King Kamehameha IV, the goal was a concession to the divided world that the Kingdom of Hawai’i had inevitably become. They founded the Queens Hospital in order to welcome Western science, and turn it to the advantage of their people. In his turn, Brown emphasized the role of the hospital as a center for service to the Hawaiian and part-Hawaiian people of the state, and-relatedly-to the less privileged sectors of the population. In this context he supported a wide and innovative range of projects in care delivery, preventive medicine, and social and cultural programs designed to build a healthier community from the ground up. His shaping of such policies proved in some ways controversial, and he faced challenges from critics seeking more focus on profitability and on a narrower definition of medical excellence. But Brown’s efforts on behalf of the Hawaiian people in the realm of medicine matched up with a wide, multifaceted movement in the islands that was generating a renewed commitment to the lives and future of Hawaiians. In that sense, Brown was playing a distinctive role in a major cultural shift, by turning the attention of big medicine in the direction of the Hawaiian renaissance. In a similar way, Brown sought also to turn big business-in this case tourism-in the same direction. During the 1980s and 1990s he promoted this vision on various fronts. As President of Mauna Lani Resort he was a key figure in the shaping of a development plan designed to accommodate tourism to traditional Hawaiian sites on a vital part of the Kona coast. And as the direct inspiration for several individual programs designed to infuse the hotel industry with an awareness of Hawaiian culture, he opened new avenues by which Hawaiian values and visitors could be brought together, for the benefit of both. He promoted this vision in a widely respected position speech at the Governor’s Tourism Conference in 1984, where he argued that “a spiritually strong Hawaiian community, united and secure in the understanding of its essential, central values” is the best basis for a productive, successful tourist business in Hawai’i. Unintentionally then, and in diverse ways too numerous to list, Kenneth Brown became a leader in the Hawaiian renaissance. A seminal thinker behind the scenes, he inspired George Kanehele’s important book length study of Hawaiian values, Ku Kanaka, Stand Tall: A Search for Hawaiian Values, published in 1986. He was a founder and major source of funding for Project WAIAHA, the group whose conversations on Hawaiian values shaped Kanahele’s work as well as the thoughts and contributions of others. By various means, through his role as president of the Hawai’i Maritime Center and his position on the board of trustees of Queens Medical Center, he found ways of supporting the voyages of the Hokule’a and the work of the Polynesian Voyaging Society as it extended its impact on the people of Hawai’i through new cultural and social programs. He forged connections across Polynesia, notably with Maoridom, where he gained inspiration from an ongoing cultural renaissance that had preceded that of the Hawaiians. There in Aotearoa/New Zealand, hearing the melody of his family name-song carried by the voices of another Polynesian people in another struggle to define their place in a complex world, he found himself in spirit. Earlier in the century, in 1966, Brown had embarked on another career. He entered the political arena as a candidate for the Democratic Party nomination for Lieutenant Governor, publicly repudiating his own family’s traditional affiliation with the Republican Party. His appearance at a voter registration center to register as a Democrat was covered by the Honolulu papers. Brown had formed a close connection with Governor John A. Burns, and, at Burns’ urging, challenged an established Democratic Party candidate, Tom Gill, for the nomination. Many believed Burns had hoped Brown could succeed him as governor. When he was defeated in the primary, and upon Burns’s reelection, Brown became special assistant to the Governor, playing a significant role in his administration. Brown’s commitment to public office developed further during this time, and in 1968 he ran for election to the State Senate. He served two terms as Senator, from 1968 to 1974. In the Senate, he spearheaded bills for the restoration of ‘Iolani Palace and Kawaiaha’o Church. His main focus of attention in the Senate, however, was as chair of the Committee on Ecology, Environment and Recreation, where he pushed through a substantial package of environmental legislation, formulating policies to guide development and to respond to problems of environmental impact. These highlights only suggest the general shape of Brown’s career over the larger part of a half-century. Shapeliness was not his priority, as one decade and one commitment succeeded another. The motto assigned by his daughter Frances White for his and Joan’s fiftieth wedding anniversary in 1997 seemed to him and to his family truly appropriate: “Having no destination, we are never lost.” Brown had many other destinations. Following the model of his uncle Francis, a well-known amateur golfer, Brown supported the growing visibility of the sport in Hawai’i, serving in 1964 as tournament chairman of the Hawai’i Canada Cup-shortly to become the World Cup, and in the following year as the first tournament chairman of the Hawaiian Open-predecessor of the Sony Open-which Brown was instrumental in launching. Brown served on the boards of directors-in several cases with a term as chair-of many major businesses in Hawai’i, from Amfac, Oceanic Cablevision, Tongg Publishing Company, Pan Pacific Development Company, and Emerald Hotels Corporation, to Hawaiian Airlines. He served from its inception as the Chairman of the Mauna Lani Resort, maintaining the Hawaiian traditions and the local site of Kalahuipua’a in the context of the area’s development. And as a result of his many, long-term connections with Japan, in 2011 he was awarded the Order of the Rising Sun by the government of Japan for his lifelong contributions to the promotion of mutual understanding between Japan and the United States and the improvement of the social status of Japanese Americans in Hawai’i. Beyond the world of business, Brown was elected to the College of Fellows of the American Institute of Architects. He served on the Historic Hawai’i Foundation, the Hawai’i Nature Center, the John A. Burns Foundation, and was the director of the Nature Conservancy, the chairman of the Hawai’i Community Development Authority, the chairman of the Board of Governors of the East-West Center, the President of the Hawai’i Maritime Center, and the Chairman of the Bishop Museum Board of Directors. He received the honorary degree of Doctor of Humanities from the University of Hawai’i in 1987, and the Red Cross Humanitarian of the Year Award in 1986. He was named a “Living Treasure” by Honpa Hongwanji Mission of Hawai’i for his manifestation of the Buddhist spirit of Dana. He received the Charles Reed Bishop Medal from the Bishop Museum for his allegiance to the vision of the museum’s founder, and the David Malo Award from the Rotary Club for outstanding contribution to the community from a person of Hawaiian ancestry. And with Joan, this “beloved husband and wife team” was recognized as Kama’aina of the Year by the Historic Hawai’i Foundation. These activities, and many others, register the many paths that Brown’s varied and lengthy lifetime in Hawai’i took. Being never lost, though, also meant that Kenneth Brown was ever seeking to find something-himself, his history, his culture, those enduring meanings for which in Hawaiian we have so many words and yet none-the mana, the spirit of the place that lived in his heart. His life reflected some part of this search, as well as the complex situation and future of Hawai’i itself, where his spirit will be alive always. Private services will be held at the grave site. A celebration of his life will take place at Waialae Country Club on Monday, February 17, with program to begin at 4:00 pm. In lieu of flowers, donations to the following organizations in honor of Kenneth Francis Brown will be much appreciated: the Bishop Museum (https://ssl.4agoodcause.com/bishop-museum/donation1.aspx), Friends of the Future (http://www.fofhawaii.org/donate.html), The Polynesian Voyaging Society (http://hokulea.org/support/)

HAROLD HUBERT (SKIP/PINEAPPLE) WELTZIEN

Posted On February 12th, 2014 -

HAROLD HUBERT (SKIP/PINEAPPLE) WELTZIEN 70, passed away Dec.5,2013 in Citra, FL from cancer. Born July 17,1943 He was a Navy Vietnam Veteran. He spent most of his life on or around horses in Hawaii, Indiana, Georgia and Florida. When no longer able to compete, he gave riding lessons to young people. He will be missed for his kolohe laugh and his big Hawaiian heart. Survived by sisters, Marilyn (Leroy) Wren (Denver, CO), Jeanne Kalahiki (Palm Desert,CA), brothers, Murdock (Norma) Weltzien (San Diego, CA), Thomas (Jackie) Weltzien (Orange, CA), Companion Juanita Smith. Family scattered ashes off Waikiki,HI. Condolences to Weltzien Ohana, 45-336 Kahowaa PL Kaneohe, HI 96744.

Norman H.M. McKeague

Posted On February 12th, 2014 -

2-12 601255  Norman McKeagueNORMAN H.M. MCKEAGUE 70, of Waimanalo, passed away on January 11, 2014, at the Queens Medical Center. He was a Heavy Equipment Optr. for Lewers & Cooke and Mid Pac Lumber and retired from HPU. Survived by wife, Esther P. McKeague; son, Keli McKeague; daughters, Kina’u (Wanda) McKeague, Kalia (Josh) Emmanuel-McKeague; mother, Helen Lilia McKeague; brothers, Kai (Charlene) McKeague, Hubert (Melody) McKeague; sisters, Lani (John) Aiwohi, Charmaine (Ale) Nee, Moana McKeague, Herberlene (Taza) Kahumoku, Helene (Ernie) Matsubara & Maile (Warren) Cummings; grand- children, Ikaika (Jehnna) McKeague, Curtis & Christian McKeague, Cody & Chazz Padilla, Lahela, Hi’ilei & Lau’ala Emmanuel-McKeague; great- grand child, Lilia McKeague. A “Sigung” Black Belt, Norman was a lifetime and dedicated member of “Sijo’s” Adriano D. Emperado’s Method. Head Instructors Instructor of the Kajukenbo Self Defense Institute Headquarters (KSDIHQ) under Grandmaster Clarence Emperado Luna, Prof, John Pascua & Prof. Donald Crummer. With at least 30 years of Self-Defense knowledge, he has taught countless men, women & children of our great system. You’ll Always Be In Our Hearts – Kajukenbo Forever! Rest In Peace Our Brother In Arms”. A “Celebration of Life” to be held at Waimanalo Hawaiian Homestead Halau 41-253 Ilauhole Street, Waimanalo, Hawaii on Sunday, February 23, from 12-6pm. Please bring photos & memories of Norman and don’t forget the laughter!

Jared Lopaka Miyasato

Posted On February 12th, 2014 -

Jan. 31 2014 JARED LOPAKA MIYASATO 29, of Portland, Oregon, a journeyman electrician, passed away January 31, 2014 in Portland. He was born in Forest Grove, Oregon. He is survived by wife, Emily, and parents Arlene (Makoto) Nakasone and Kevin C. Miyasato, brother and sister, Jonathan and Jordan Nakasone, maternal grand- mother Susan Higa, paternal grandparents Marlene (James) Kerner, and Robert S. Miyasato, and paternal great- grandfather George Nahina Sr. Also survived by uncles, Randy (Marah) Higa, Nick (Faith) Miyasato, Blaine J. Miyasato and aunt, Audrey (Shannon) Parker. Jared is also survived by loving in-laws, Lyle and Geri Ritz of Portland and by great aunts and uncles, and cousins among the Nahina, Ha’o, and Mancia families of Hawaii and Portland. Services being held in Portland, Oregon with a simulcast tie-in to Aiea, Saturday 1:00 p.m. at Aiea Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses, 99-210 Heleconia Place, Aiea, HI 96701. No flowers, please.

Sandi R. Apuna

Posted On February 12th, 2014 -

2-12 601278  Sandi ApunaAPUNA, SANDI R. 66, of Mesa, Arizona passed away peacefully on January 31, 2014. She was born in Fort Wayne, Indiana, graduated from high school in Huntertown, Indiana, received a B.A. degree in Creative Drama and Elementary Education from the University of Washington in Seattle, and an M.Ed degree in Reading and Language Arts from the University of Hawaii. In Hawaii Sandi worked with John Hancock as marketing manager, President of East Honolulu Association of Life Underwriters, served with the Business and Professional Women’s foundation, Junior League of Honolulu, listed in the “Who’s Who of American Women, Reserve Officers Association, The Retired Officers Association, and taught at Solomon Elementary school, Schofield. Sandi moved to Mesa in 1992 and worked in the Gilbert Public Schools in Gilbert Arizona, first as a reading specialist and ultimately as the District reading interventionist. She specialized in reading development and dyslexia, implemented curricula, and trained many reading specialists in the District before retiring in 2013. She also was active in the U.S. Army Reserve, where she rose to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. After 9/11, she served for two years as an anti-terrorism officer with the Pacific Command in Hawaii and was awarded the Defense Meritorious Service Medal. She was preceded in death by her husband of 30 years, Samuel K. Apuna, who died in 2010. She is survived by her step- mother Charlotte Rosenberry; her brother Dr. Terrone Rosenberry; her step- daughters Melanie Denny, Michelle Barker and Melissa Apuna and her step-sons Samuel Apuna III and John Apuna; 11 grandchildren and 1 great-grandchild. Visitation 9 am. on Wednesday, Feb.19, 2014 at Nuuanu Memorial Park, service at 10 am., committal service 1pm. at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (Punchbowl). In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Hospice of the Valley in Phoenix, Arizona, or to the American Cancer Society.

BETTY MAE LING

Posted On February 12th, 2014 -

BETTY MAE LING 87, retired Aiea Elementary School kindergarten teacher, died, January 22, 2014 at Maluhia Nursing and Rehabilitation Center. She was the daughter of Mrs. Alice Beams and stepdaughter of Mr. B.H. Beams, both deceased. She had no children. Services will be held at Diamond Head Memorial Park Chapel on Thursday, February 13, 2014. Visitation is at 9:00-9:30 AM, service is at 9:45-10:30 AM, and burial is to follow at the memorial park. Family requests no flowers however donations to designated charities will be accepted at the service. A luncheon for friends and family will be held at Happy Days Restaurant 3553 Waialae at 11:30 AM.

JOSEPH “JOE” BAPTISTA MILHO, JR.

Posted On February 12th, 2014 -

JOSEPH JOE BAPTISTA MILHO, JR. Age 93, of Waipahu, HI, passed away January 21, 2014 in Kailua. Born May 27, 1920 in Kilauea, Kauai. Retired supervisor from Oahu Sugar Company. Member of Senior Bowling League for Leeward Bowl. He is survived by daughter, Judy Milho Dela Cruz; sons, Joseph B. (Michel) Milho III, Alex D. (Lorraine) Milho, Eugene G. (Melanie) Milho; 9 grandchildren; 20 great-grand- children; 2 great-great-grand- children. Visitation 5:30 p.m. Monday (Feb. 17) at Mililani Mortuary Mauka Chapel; Memorial Service 6:30 p.m. Casual Attire. Flowers Welcome.

NICOLAS MIFA OCTUBRE

Posted On February 11th, 2014 -

NICOLAS MIFA OCTUBRE Age 106, of Waipahu, HI, passed away January 9, 2014 in Waipahu. Born November 10, 1907 in Bet-ang, Balaoan, La-Union, Philippines. A member of the Hawaii Laborers Union, Local 368. He attended St Joseph Catholic Church, Waipahu. He is survived by daughter, Florence (Josue) Ologani; sister, Eduarda Navalta; brother: Marcelino (Aurelia) Octubre Sr.; 2 grandchildren; 3 great-grand- children; nieces & nephews. Visitation 5:30 p.m. Wednesday (Feb. 12) at Mililani Mortuary Mauka Chapel; Wake Service 6:30 p.m. Visitation also 8:30 a.m. Thursday (Feb. 13) at St Joseph Catholic Church; (94-675 Farrington Hwy., Waipahu) Mass 9:30 a.m. Burial 11:00 a.m. at Mililani Memorial Park. Casual Attire.

LIBRADA “RITA” TECSON LASTIMADO

Posted On February 11th, 2014 -

LIBRADA RITA TECSON LASTIMADO Age 90, of Chula Vista, CA, passed away December 5, 2013 in San Diego. Born January 17, 1923 in Honolulu, HI. A graduate of Sacred Hearts Academy. A sales associate with Kress Store, Moanalua Shopping Center. She is survived by sons, Robert A. Lastimado, Benedict (Jutta) Lastimado, Ernest T. Lastimado; daughters, Theresa (August) Rivera, Veronica Lastimado; sister, Sarah; 12 grandchildren; 16 great-grand- children; 1 great-great-grand- child. Visitation 9:00 a.m. Saturday (Feb. 15) at Mililani Mortuary Makai Chapel; Memorial Service 10:30 a.m. Burial 11:30 a.m. at Mililani Memorial Park. Casual Attire. No flowers, please.

CHESTER AKIO KAITOKU

Posted On February 11th, 2014 -

CHESTER AKIO KAITOKU Age 62, of Wahiawa, HI, passed away December 31, 2013 in Wahiawa. Born October 27, 1951 in Wahiawa, HI. He retired from the City & County of Honolulu, Building Department after 26 years as a mechanical engineer. A member of the Wahiawa Hongwanji, Wahiawa & American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He is survived by sister, Elaine (Raymond) Fukuda; niece, nephews, & grand niece. Visitation 5:15 p.m. Sunday (Feb. 16) at Mililani Mortuary Mauka Chapel; Memorial Service 6:30 p.m. Casual Attire. No Flowers, please.

KIYOKO “KAY” TERAO

Posted On February 10th, 2014 -

KIYOKO KAY TERAO Age 94, of Kapaa, HI, formerly of Ewa, passed away January 22, 2014 at Wailua Homesteads, Kaui. Born January 9, 1920 in Lihue, Kauai. Retired from State of Hawaii. Member of Ewa Hongwanji. She is survived by sons, Ryne (Billie) Terao of Wailua Homesteads, Lindy (Debbie) Terao; 5 grandchildren; brothers, Robert Saiki, James (May) Saiki, Clifton (Florence) Saiki. Visitation 5:30 p.m. Saturday (Feb. 15) at Mililani Mortuary Makai Chapel; Memorial Service 6:30 p.m. Casual Attire. No flowers, please.

TOSHIO ARAKI

Posted On February 10th, 2014 -

TOSHIO ARAKI Age 85, of Mililani, HI, passed away January 17, 2014 in Mililani. Born July 30, 1928 in Wailea, HI. Toshio was a retired Accountant of Hawaiian Telephone Co., & past Treasurer of IBEW-Local 1357. He is survived by wife, Jane Araki; son, Clinton (Virginia) Araki; daughters, Janice (Jim) Reisch, Eunice Araki of WA, Jody (Brian) Fong; sister, Shirley Kai; 7 grandchildren; 1 great-grandson. Visitation 9:30 a.m. Friday (Feb 14) at Mililani Mortuary Makai Chapel; Memorial Service 10:30 a.m.

EVELYN HOOLAAPUNI “HONEYGIRL” BISHAW SING

Posted On February 10th, 2014 -

EVELYN HOOLAAPUNI HONEYGIRL BISHAW SING 86, of Waianae, was born on November 13th, 1927 in Ho’olehua, Moloka’i, passed away surrounded by family in Lahaina, Maui on January 23rd, 2014. Retired after 41 years as a telecommunications operator with the Federal government, Hickam Air Force Base and 15 years with Waianae Coast Comprehensive Health Center. Preceded in death by parents: Christian and Henrietta Bishaw; Sisters: Kaonohi Groves and Malia Rees; Brothers: Christian, Elia, Jack, and Solomon Bishaw. Survived by daughters: Erilyn (Cornwell) Kaiwi of Lahaina, Kehau Kahalewai and Pua’ala Bishaw (Rich) Wilbur of Honolulu; 7 Grandchildren; 14 Great- Grandchildren; Numerous nieces, nephews, and grand nieces and nephews. Survived by brothers: Alexander Sr. (Ale) of Ho’olehua, Moloka’i and David (Honeyboy) of Honolulu. Visitation: Nuuanu Cemetery. Date: Thursday February 13th, 2014. Time: 4pm-8pm. Burial: Kanakaloloa Cemetery, Ho’olehua, Moloka’i. Date: Saturday, February 15th, 2014. Time: 11:00 am. Family request limiting flowers to leis only.

JANET NAVAI

Posted On February 9th, 2014 -

2-9 JANET NAVAI b&wJANET NAVAI Janet Navai, the beloved wife of Na’i Navai, the devoted mother to sons, Adeeb and Anees and loving daughter to Qudrat & Yadollah Moshrefzadeh, passed away peacefully on February 4, 2013 at Queens Hospital surrounded by family. Janet was a devoted member of the Baha’i Faith, an advocate for the poor and needy, dedicated to the betterment of her community, consecrated her life to service and bringing joy and unity to everyone who crossed her path. She will be dearly missed by all who knew and loved her. We celebrate her ever-advancing spiritual development throughout the worlds of God.

WRIGHT ERNEST ‘BUDDY’ UPCHURCH

Posted On February 9th, 2014 -

2-9 WRIGHT ERNEST UPCHURCHWRIGHT ERNEST ‘BUDDY’ UPCHURCH Dec. 12, 2013 Wright Ernest “Buddy” Upchurch, 76, retired Quality Assurance Specialist for Rockwell Intl. Rocketdyne Division, died December 12, 2013 at Pali Momi Medical Center. He was born in Punchbowl on February 14, 1937. He is survived by: Wife: Margaret Upchurch; sons: Allen Upchurch, Ransom Upchurch, Wesley Upchurch; daughter: Anna Upchurch; 8 grand- children, 2 great grandchildren; brother: James Upchurch; sisters, Caroline St. Germaine, Roberta Kalilikane. Many extended family and friends. Celebration of life, opening prayer, eulogy and music from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Friday, February 14, 2014 at Blessed Sacrament church; Mass at 11 a.m. Inurnment at 3 p.m. at National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (Punchbowl). Aloha attire. No flowers. Aloha my Pohaku my Kuuipo.

Librada Cabotaje Ancheta

Posted On February 9th, 2014 -

2-9 LIBRADA CABOTAJE ANCHETALIBRADA CABOTAJE ANCHETA Was born to Kentina Cabotaje and Vicente Lavin on November 29, 1921. At the end of World War II she met Cirilo C. Ancheta and in 1946, they married. In 1947, she travelled to Hawaii to join dad and the family followed with David, Gilbert, Ben, Raymond, and Mary Ann. She ingrained in her children the values of family unity, hard work, service, and love for God. She cared for dad as Alzheimer and Parkinson disease slowly took him away until he passed away on September 7, 1987. She was a devoted member of Saint Joseph Catholic Church in Waipahu and was active in the Filipino Catholic Club and the Lady’s Alter Society. She loved singing and caring with her 11 grand children and 20 great grand children. Family was everything to her. She carried herself with strength, pride, dignity and courage until the end. On January 10, 2014, at the age of 92, she reunited with dad. We miss you mom. We will always love you. Give dad a hug and kiss for us.

LILA CHUN CHRYSTAL

Posted On February 9th, 2014 -

2-9 LILA CHRYSTALLILA CHUN CHRYSTAL 82 of Honolulu, Hawaii died on January 17, 2014 at the Kaiser Medical Center. She was borh March 18, 1931 in Waialua, Hawaii. Mrs. Chrystal was the Director of Nursing at the Hawaii State Hospital. She later became and retired as the Adminstrative Nurse for the Department of Health. Survived by brothers, Henry (May) and Thomas (Kay) Chun; sisters, Grace Siu and Gladys (Robert) Lee; nieces and nephews and other relatives. Preceded in death in 2000 by husband James Chrystal. Visitation Wedneday, February 12, 2014 from 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. at the Sts. Peter and Paul Catholic Church. A Mass will be celebrated at 9:00 a.m. Inurnment will be held on Thursday, February 13, 2014 at 2:15 p.m. at the Diamond Head Memorial Park. In lieu of monetary gifts donations may be made in her memory to the donor’s favorite charity. Casual Attire. No flowers.

SUZANNE HIROTA

Posted On February 9th, 2014 -

SUZANNE HIROTA 58, of Hilo, passed away on January 27. Suzie is survived by her husband, Lyle Hirota; mother, Setsuko Asato; sister Laureen and brother Kelly. Services will be held at Makawao Hongwanji Mission on Sunday, February 16, at 1 p.m. Casual attire. Donations, in lieu of monetary gifts, may be made to the American Cancer Society.

Donna C. Wellman

Posted On February 9th, 2014 -

2-9 600180  Donna WellmanDONNA C. WELLMAN Age 56, formerly of Pearl City, passed away peacefully in her husband’s embrace on January 30, 2014, following a lifelong challenge with congenital heart issues. Born in Philadelphia, she attended Bloomsburg University and Brigham Young University. Donna and her husband Tom were married at the LDS Jordan River Temple 31 years ago. Following their wedding, they lived in Hawaii for most of their lives and had a great love and respect for the Hawaiian culture. She will be deeply missed by her family and friends for her calm demeanor, patience and grace. Aside from a deep love for her family, Donna had many interests. She was a wonderful cook and her Italian dinners were always a hit. She was an avid fan of Rick Springfield, through which she had many friends. She loved football, philosophy, music, art, poetry, religion and teaching. In addition to her husband, she is survived by her son David and his wife Lindsay of Pennsylvania; hanai brother Edward of Arizona; sister Sandra of Pennsylvania; and cousins, in-laws, nieces, nephews and hanai family throughout the country. In lieu of flowers, the family recommends contributions to the Children’s Heart Foundation (http://www. ChildrensHeartFoundation.org), the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (http://www.JDRF.org) or the Thomas and Donna Wellman Charitable Foundation (c/o WFA, 1000 Chesterbrook Ave., Berwin, PA 19312.) A Celebration of Life, will be held at Our Savior Lutheran Church in Aiea, in April. Me ke aloha pumehana! A me Ka aloha pau’ole!

ALANA WONG LAU

Posted On February 9th, 2014 -

2-9 ALANA WONG LAUALANA WONG LAU 87, a pioneering woman attorney of Hawaii, passed away on Sunday, December 15, 2013 in Honolulu. The second of five children of Ah Kwo and Sun Lin Wong, Mrs. Lau grew up in the McCully neighborhood of Honolulu. A 1946 alumna of the University of Hawai’i, she left Hawai’i for the first time to attend Northwestern University School of Law in Chicago, Illinois. One of only five women in her graduating class, and the only Asian, she returned to the islands and was among the first women admitted to the Hawai’i bar. Mrs. Lau worked with the Department of Public Works in the Highways Rights-of-Way Division before becoming Deputy Attorney General in 1953, a position she held until 1976. She served in a number of departments during her tenure, notably the Tax, Land, and Social Services divisions. Mrs. Lau then started a solo law practice focused on wills and trusts. She was very proud of her all-women team. Remembering her own struggles, Mrs. Lau felt great responsibility for advising and opening doors of opportunity to women in the legal professions. In 2003, the Hawaii Women Lawyers Association awarded Mrs. Lau its Lifetime Achievement Award. In 2005, the Hawaii State Bar Association honored her as one of six Legal Legends of Hawaii. Mrs. Lau is survived by her sister, Lavinia, brothers Livingston and Alvin, her daughters Laurie and Lisa and two grandchildren. Mrs. Lau’s husband of more than 55 years was the late Dr. Lawrence Lit Lau, Jr. A memorial service open to the public will be held for Mrs. Lau at Nuuanu Memorial Park and Mortuary East Chapel on Friday, February 14, 2014 at 9:30 AM. Visitation begins at 8:30 AM. A private ceremony will follow at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific at Punchbowl. In lieu of flowers, gifts may be made to the Alvin and Trudy Wong ‘Ohana Scholarship at the East-West Center Foundation, 1601 East-West Road, Honolulu, Hawaii 96848-1601.

NICOLAS MIFA OCTUBRE

Posted On February 9th, 2014 -

NICOLAS MIFA OCTUBRE Age 106, of Waipahu, HI, passed away January 9, 2014 in Waipahu. Born November 10, 1907 in Bet-ang, Balaoan, La-Union, Philippines. A member of the Hawaii Laborers Union, Local 368. He attended St Joseph Catholic Church, Waipahu. He is survived by daughter, Florence (Josue) Ologani; sister, Eduarda Navalta; brother: Marcelino (Aurelia) Octubre Sr.; 2 grandchildren; 3 great-grand- children; nieces & nephews. Visitation 5:30 p.m. Wednesday (Feb. 12) at Mililani Mortuary Mauka Chapel; Wake Service 6:30 p.m. Visitation also 8:30 a.m. Thursday (Feb. 13) at St Joseph Catholic Church; (94-675 Farrington Hwy., Waipahu) Mass 9:30 a.m. Burial 11:00 a.m. at Mililani Memorial Park. Casual Attire.

BARBARA ANN KEALA CLIFTON

Posted On February 9th, 2014 -

BARBARA ANN KEALA CLIFTON Age 74, passed away on January 7, 2014 in Vallejo, California. Born July 12, 1939 in Ulupalakua, Maui. She was a Kupuna for a Hawaiian Cultural Program and a former employee of Farm Air Service Inc. in California as a secretary. She is survived by brothers, John (Rosaline) Keali’i, James Kimo (Leila) Pihana, Simeon Ku’ulei (Beth) Pihana; sisters, Nancy Kanani English, Winona Thelma Chaney, Sally Maile (James) Gow, Iona Ku’uipo (Melvin) Kalahiki, Frances Leina’ala (Chester) Hoapili, Ida Mae Kehaulani (Trini Navarres) Pihana; son, Millard Sonny C.K. (Nani) Clifton Jr.; daughters, Sherry (Chris) Clifton, Tanya (Jesse Houghtailing) Clifton; hanai daughter, Ellen (John Smith) Kamai; 12 grandchildren; 15 great-grandchildren. Visitation 9:30am Tuesday (February 11) at Mililani Mortuary Makai Chapel, Funeral Service 10:30 a.m. Burial 1:30pm at Mililani Memorial Park. Aloha Attire. Flowers Welcome.

GEORGE KYNSTON “KEOKI” KANEKAWAIOLA LINDSEY SR.

Posted On February 9th, 2014 -

2-9, 2-16 GEORGE K. LINDSEYGEORGE KYNSTON KEOKI KANEKAWAIOLA LINDSEY SR. George Kynston “Keoki” Kanekawaiola Lindsey Sr., 86, of Pearl City, passed away peacefully at home on January 16, 2014. He was born on October 22, 1927, in Waialua, Moloka`i to Charles Robert Lindsey, Sr. and Julia Mailekini Kahele. He is survived by his wife Joan (Sniffen), sons George Kynston “Kanekawaiola” Lindsey Jr. (Tricia), Bryan Haleola Lindsey (Lori), Robert Michael Keikilani Lindsey (Nova), and daughter LaJoy Anelalani Lindsey-Hanohano (Malcolm Hanohano), 16 grand- children and six great grandchildren. He is also survived by his brothers John “Buck” Lindsey and James “Kimo” Lindsey; sisters Elvin “Maile” Lee, Marylane “Merle” Piper, and Eleanor “Lala” Pietz; Predeceased by his parents, beloved brothers Charles Robert “Brother” Lindsey, Anthony “Tony” Lindsey, Bernard Lindsey, Edwin “Eddie” Lindsey, Thomas “Tom” Lindsey and dear sister Ana Cox. He attended Kilohana School on Moloka’i and graduated from St. Louis High School in 1945. He served in the U.S. Army from 1945 to 1947. He had a long career in the Honolulu Fire Department where he retired as a Fire Captain in 1979. He later worked as a Fire Inspector with the Hickam Federal Fire Department where he retired in 2005. Being a firefighter was his passion, always wanting to be of service to not only his family and friends but to all others in need. He was a multi-talented man who was self-taught in many musical instruments from the piano, vibes, ‘ukulele and guitar serving as guitarist over the years at many hula performances for his family’s halau. Visitation on February 21, 2014, at 8:30 a.m. at Borthwick Mortuary, Vineyard Chapel. Services at 10 a.m. Burial at 12:30 p.m., National Cemetery of the Pacific, Punchbowl.

RICHARD MUNRO TOWILL

Posted On February 9th, 2014 -

2-9 RICHARD MUNRO TOWILLRICHARD MUNRO TOWILL Richard Munro Towill was born in Honolulu to Roswell Murray and Jeannie Munro Towill on 29 June, 1929. His fondest childhood memory was the sweet sound of nahenahe Hawaiian melodies, shared by Hawaiian musicians, who would travel the neighborhood during the holidays in a touring car in Kapa’a, on Kauai. While growing up at the top of Ke’eaumoku Street, he recalled hearing the lions roar from the Honolulu Zoo on a Kona night. A graduate of Hanahau’oli School and then a member of the class of 1947 at Punahou School, he earned a degree in Civil Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, followed by two years of service in the Air Force at Wright Field. Joining his dad in Honolulu, he worked for and assumed the presidency at the RM Towill Corporation and with his leadership; the company became one of the largest Civil Engineering, Surveying and Aerial mapping concerns in Hawai’i. During his tenure some of the most notable projects included the designs of; the Hawaiian Memorial and the Valley of the Temples Memorial Parks, the Honolulu Airport’s reef runway, the Queen Ka’ahumanu Highway on Hawai’i island, the Sand Island and Honouliuli Wastewater Treatment Plants, and his favorite and one he was most proud of; the Mount Ka’ala access road. Inspired by the sweet melodies of his childhood and love of Hawaiian music, and along with the loving help of Marge Hansen his most celebrated achievement and gift to the Hawaiian community has been 29 years of Ka Himeni Ana. Begun at Orvis Auditorium and then home at the Hawai’i Theatre, the concert encourages budding musicians to share their talents of Hawaiian music, the nahenahe way and unamplified. Some of the many successful groups over the years include Alea, Pekelo, Holunape, Kanilau, Hookena and many others. Each concert has offered an evening with the abundance of lei, aloha, the fragrance of awapuhi, and the sweet sounds of nahenahe Hawaiian music. Richard would describe the evening as “a treat to the senses and where all of the participants were winners!” The other remarkable achievement was the publishing of his grandfather “Pa” Munro’s; The Story of Lana’i, which he and son Rick filled with old images of ranching days on Lana’i as well as the genealogies of all of the Hawaiian families on Lana’i that Pa completed, as begun by Charles Gay when he owned the island. Richard’s “service above self” as a long standing member of The Rotary Club of Honolulu also included service as a Board member of; Schuman Carriage Company, the Hawai’i Opera Theatre, the Lyon Arboretum, and The Hawaiian Music Hall of Fame. He expected the highest standard of excellence, and at the same time he showered his family, friends, and colleagues with an abundance of love and aloha. He received the Kalani Alii award (the highest of honors) bestowed upon him by the four Royal Societies (Ahu Hipa) in 2012. Richard “pushed off” very comfortably and peacefully at home on the afternoon of 30 January with his beloved caregiver Amara. He is survived by his former wife Pats, their son Rick and daughter Liz, grandsons Mark and Ian, nieces, nephews and cousins. The Family will host a final “Cheerio” and Celebration of Life on 16 February at 3 PM at the home of Crystal and Rick; 47-460 Waihe’e Place in Kahalu’u. No flowers or lei please, but donations may be made to the Richard M. Towill family Foundation.

Harold L. “Bill” Child, Jr.

Posted On February 9th, 2014 -

2-9 600540   Harold Child JrHAROLD L. BILL CHILD, JR. Former FBI Special Agent and Legal Attache Harold L. “Bill” Child, Jr. passed away on January 16, 2014 in Honolulu at the age of 93. Born in Oakland, CA, Bill and his parents were displaced by the Depression and came to Hawaii in 1931, living first in Honolulu and later in Wahiawa. Bill attended the University of Hawaii, studying foreign languages, and joined the FBI upon graduation in 1941, working in various field offices throughout the U.S. He met the love of his life, Patty (Hall) on her first day reporting to duty as secretary at the Seattle FBI office, and soon thereafter they were married in Honolulu. Because of his fluency in Japanese, as well as his outstanding field work, he subsequently opened the original office of the Legal Attache in the American Embassy in Tokyo in 1954, covering not only Japan but also Taiwan, Hong Kong, the Philippines, Singapore and South Korea. Upon his retirement in 1976, Bill was honored to receive a number of awards and decorations, including the prestigious Third Class of the Order of the Sacred Treasure from the Emperor of Japan, for his contribution to cooperation between the U.S. and Japan in the field of law enforcement. Upon retirement, Bill’s dream was to return to Hawaii and trade liaison and reporting for “muddy, calloused hands.” He formed a development company and built homes in Wahiawa, doing much of the construction work himself. His next phase of “retirement” utilized his Far East contacts in challenging and enjoyable work and travel as a security consultant for several U.S. companies. Bill was a lifelong learner who loved languages and pondering the mysteries of life. He enjoyed carpentry, building furniture for his home and totem poles with his grandchildren. He loved playing bridge, reading mystery novels, and traveling with his beloved Patty. Bill truly lived his life according to the values that meant the most to him: loyalty, integrity and optimism in his work, his family and his friendships, and in fact, in all of his relationships. He was a loving and devoted son, husband and father, and a hero to his grandchildren. In addition to his wife Patty of 66 years, Bill is survived by his daughter Lynne and her husband Carl Franceschi of Needham, MA, his daughter in law Sandra Child of Chapel Hill, NC, his eight grandchildren, and one great grandchild. He was predeceased by his two sons, Michael and John. A family gathering in his memory will take place later this year in Honolulu.

LYN J. KUX

Posted On February 9th, 2014 -

2-9 LYN J. KUXLYN J. KUX Lyn passed away on Wednesday, February 5, 2014 at Castle Hospital in Kailua. She fought a long brave battle against Multiple Myeloma with Courage, Strength, Grace, Dignity and Grit. Lyn was born in Sacramento, CA to Andrew and Betty (Baker) Miner. She was later adopted by her step-father, Dan Littleton whom she loved dearly. Lyn graduated from UC Berkley and traveled to Hawaii on the Lurline where she met her first husband, Dave Cowan. She and Dave had four children, two of whom were born in Queenstown, NZ where they lived for 5 years. In 1977 Lyn married Steve Kux. He was her best friend, confidant and travel partner. They shared 37 amazing years together. Lyn lived her life to the fullest. She loved being on the water – Hobie Cat racing, windsurfing and stand up paddle boarding in Kailua Bay and sailing on her boat, Kuleana. She was also an avid marathon runner for many years and kept up with her physical fitness to the very end. Lyn loved adventure. She and Steve traveled the world together and crossed many things off their bucket list. Her career path was also an adventure. She worked as an animal trainer at Sea Life Park and Kewalo Basin, then earned her LCSW from UH Manoa and spent the remainder of her career helping people in her private practice. Her most recent passion was being a docent at the Honolulu Museum of Art where she focused on the Wounded Warrior Program. Even thru her chemotherapy, she and her therapy dog Lili showed up to help the warriors. Lyn is survived by her husband, Steve Kux; children, Tiare (Rich) Pinto, Jeff (Tori) Cowan, Rick (Luisa) Cowan and Lisa (Tommy) Routsong; grandchildren, David, Andrew, Austin, Kainoa, Nai’a, Rudy, Sam and Max; great-grandchildren, Cadence and Aidyn; sisters, Rene and Karen; and her beloved dogs, Sasha, Lili and Daisy and cats, Tink and Punkin. A private service was held at Kalama Beach in Kailua. Gifts in her memory may be made to the Honolulu Art Museum – Wounded Warrior Program or the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation. The family would like to extend their love and appreciation to the caring staff at Castle Hospital and a special thank you to Dr. Cho and Dr. Naai and all of their staff for caring for Lyn for the last 10 years.

GEORGE KYNSTON “KEOKI” KANEKAWAIOLA LINDSEY SR.

Posted On February 9th, 2014 -

GEORGE KYNSTON KEOKI KANEKAWAIOLA LINDSEY SR. George Kynston “Keoki” Kanekawaiola Lindsey Sr., 86, of Pearl City, passed away peacefully at home on January 16, 2014. He was born on October 22, 1927, in Waialua, Moloka`i to Charles Robert Lindsey, Sr. and Julia Mailekini Kahele. He is survived by his wife Joan (Sniffen), sons George Kynston “Kanekawaiola” Lindsey Jr. (Tricia), Bryan Haleola Lindsey (Lori), Robert Michael Keikilani Lindsey (Nova), and daughter LaJoy Anelalani Lindsey-Hanohano (Malcolm Hanohano), 16 grand- children and six great grandchildren. He is also survived by his brothers John “Buck” Lindsey and James “Kimo” Lindsey; sisters Elvin “Maile” Lee, Marylane “Merle” Piper, and Eleanor “Lala” Pietz; Predeceased by his parents, beloved brothers Charles Robert “Brother” Lindsey, Anthony “Tony” Lindsey, Bernard Lindsey, Edwin “Eddie” Lindsey, Thomas “Tom” Lindsey and dear sister Ana Cox. He attended Kilohana School on Moloka’i and graduated from St. Louis High School in 1945. He served in the U.S. Army from 1945 to 1947. He had a long career in the Honolulu Fire Department where he retired as a Fire Captain in 1979. He later worked as a Fire Inspector with the Hickam Federal Fire Department where he retired in 2005. Being a firefighter was his passion, always wanting to be of service to not only his family and friends but to all others in need. He was a multi-talented man who was self-taught in many musical instruments from the piano, vibes, ‘ukulele and guitar serving as guitarist over the years at many hula performances for his family’s halau. Visitation on February 21, 2014, at 8:30 a.m. at Borthwick Mortuary, Vineyard Chapel. Services at 10 a.m. Burial at 12:30 p.m., National Cemetery of the Pacific, Punchbowl.

Harold Hubert (Skip/Pineapple)

Posted On February 8th, 2014 -

HAROLD HUBERT (SKIP/PINEAPPLE) 70, passed away Dec.5,2013 in Citra, FL from cancer. Born July 17,1943 He was a Navy Vietnam Veteran. He spent most of his life on or around horses in Hawaii, Indiana, Georgia and Florida. When no longer able to compete, he gave riding lessons to young people. He never met a person who didn’t become his friend. He will be missed for his kolohe laugh and his big Hawaiian heart. Survived by sisters, Marilyn (Leroy) Wren (Denver,CO), Jeanne Kalahiki (Palm Desert,CA), brothers, Murdock (Norma) Weltzien (San Diego, CA), Thomas (Jackie) Weltzien (Orange, CA), Companion Juanita Smith. Family scattered ashes off Waikiki,HI. Condolences to Weltzien Ohana, 45-336 Kahowaa PL Kaneohe, HI 96744.

MARSHALL TAIJIRO TANAKA

Posted On February 8th, 2014 -

MARSHALL TAIJIRO TANAKA Age 92, of Honolulu, passed away peacefully at home on January 31, 2014. Correction to obituary.

JOSEPH ELABAN

Posted On February 8th, 2014 -

JOSEPH ELABAN, 85 Joseph Elaban, 85, of Kailua, died on January 17, 2014, at Castle Hospital in Honolulu. Visitation will begin at 11 a.m. Saturday, February 15, 2014 at Borthwick Mortuary- Mauka Chapel with a Service at 11:45 a.m. Burial to follow at 3:00 p.m. at Hawaiian Memorial Park Cemetery. Borthwick Mortuary-Honolulu is assisting with the arrangements. Joseph Elaban was born on October 27, 1928, in Wailuku, Maui. He was the son of Pedro and Virginia (Kamaka) Elaban of Pukalani. He was a Retired Ground Maintenance Foreman for The National Cemetery of the Pacific. He is survived by three son’s William W. (Cindy), Joseph Jr. (Blanche) and Tommy L. (Becky); two daughters Geraldine and Catherine; 10 grandchildren, 17 great grandchildren and 3 great, great grandchildren. Joseph enjoyed fishing on his boat named “Abby E”, he also liked weightlifting, riding motorcycle and singing songs by Don Ho and Elvis.


- Denotes U.S. Military Veteran